Yahoo! for Kids sponsors charity site

Howard Lake | 4 April 1999 | News  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis In fact the support has been given from the charitable arm of Yahoo! for Kids which works to support the activities of children’s charities. Yahoo! has supported over 400 non-profit groups in the US and internationally. As well as online auctions it has assisted with online campaigns, donated banner ad space, contributed volunteer services, and entered into co-operative marketing sponsorships.Yahoo! has supported over 400 non-profit groups in the US and internationally. As well as online auctions it has assisted with online campaigns, donated banner ad space, contributed volunteer services, and entered into co-operative marketing sponsorships.The latest non-profit to benefit is the US Mark McGwire Foundation for Children. Yahoo! has developed and hosted the site, and will donate banner ad space and print and radio advertising. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Yahoo! for Kids sponsors charity site About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

NCBI open Munster’s only dedicated children’s charity shop in Limerick

first_imgDonal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Print LimerickNewsNCBI open Munster’s only dedicated children’s charity shop in LimerickBy Meghann Scully – November 8, 2019 664 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Twitter Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash WhatsApp Advertisement Previous articleLimerick Post Show | November 8th 2019Next articleLimerick Jersey for New York Hurling Classic released Meghann Scully RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Email TAGScharitychildrenfashionKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostLimerick Post ShowNCBI Facebook Linda Hayes, Manager NCBI Limerick Store and Paul Saunders wearing his casual outfit chosen by the NCBI Staff.The National Council for the Blind Ireland (NCBI) is delighted to open Munster’s only dedicated children’s charity shop on William Street, Limerick.The store will be selling pre-loved clothes, buggies, cots and toys that are in good condition.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up They are also looking for donations of such items that they can then sell on in the shop and raise funds for the charity.Karen Meagher, Area Manager South West said “We are delighted to open a shop specifically to meet the needs of children. By supporting our NCBI shops, customers not only generate funds for our services including those dedicated to children and young people with sight loss but also our drive to support the environment through the re-use and recycling of fashion and furniture. With the run up to Christmas this shop couldn’t be opening at a better time.“We hope the NCBI store will become a cornerstone of the community as it has in so many other communities across the country. We are heartened to see the ongoing growth of our stores which in turn enable us to offer a suite of services to those who are blind or visually impaired.” she added.NCBI is the national sight loss organisation, working for people with sight loss.They provide practical and emotional support, rehabilitation services and other training designed to help people with sight loss to live independently and confidently. Linkedinlast_img read more

CAC’s mediation role is called into question

first_img Previous Article Next Article CAC’s mediation role is called into questionOn 13 Jun 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Employers and legal experts questioned this week whether the mediating body that will resolve union recognition disputes can do its job properly.The claims came after it emerged that firms fighting recognition rights with unions will be told by members of the Central Arbitration Committee not to tell them everything, as it may have to use that information against them later.The revelation questions the ability of the CAC to play any meaningful role in helping employers and unions reach an amicable agreement on recognition – one of its main duties.The problem is caused by the CAC’s conflicting role as both mediator and judge. Its first duty is to act as go-between, listening to each side’s position and trying to broker an agreement. It will consider which employees should make up the bargaining unit and how the process should work when a union makes a claim for recognition.But if an agreement cannot be reached it will act as judge and impose a decision. Anything it has learnt in the mediation process will influence its decision.Raymond Jeffers, head of employment law at Linklaters said the CAC’s role as mediator will be compromised as employers will not be able to speak freely.Sir Michael Burton, chairman of the CAC admitted that it will have to advise employers not to tell it certain things. “We will have to say there are certain facts that we won’t be able to put out of our minds,” he told Personnel Today. “We may say to someone ‘don’t tell us that, keep it for Acas or for yourselves’.”Michael Gooddie, HR director at GNER and an expert in industrial relations, said the success of mediation depends on honesty and openness. “Everything has to be brought out into the open. What is not brought out will potentially wreck the process downstream,” he said. www.cac.gov.uk Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more