Super Rugby 2017 – Round 9 Highlights

first_imgFriday Apr 21, 2017 Super Rugby 2017 – Round 9 Highlights The Southern Kings secured an unbelievable upset victory over the Waratahs in Sydney earlier today, as round nine of Super Rugby kicked into gear. The Brumbies scored a scorcher, but the Hurricanes continued their dominant form. All highlights posted here soon. *All highlights are now up to date belowSHARKS vs REBELSThe Sharks and Rebels each had a player red carded on Saturday as they played out a 9-9 draw in their Super Rugby meeting in Durban.BULLS vs CHEETAHSThe Bulls’ recent resurgence continued when they claimed a 20-14 victory over the Cheetahs in Pretoria on Saturday.FORCE vs CHIEFSThe Chiefs ended their tour on a high with a hard-fought 16-7 victory over the Western Force in Perth on Saturday.CRUSADERS vs STORMERSThe Crusaders recorded their highest ever score over the Stormers, winning 57-24 in Christchurch to remain unbeaten in 2017.HIGHLANDERS vs SUNWOLVESThe Highlanders made it five wins in a row when they beat the spirited Sunwolves 40-15 on their first ever visit to Invercargill Stadium.LIONS vs JAGUARESThe Lions were made to work hard before securing a 24-21 victory over a spirited Jaguares side in Johannesburg on Friday.WARATAHS vs KINGSThe Kings secured a massively significant 26-17 come-from-behind victory over the Waratahs in Sydney on Friday.HURRICANES vs BRUMBIESEight converted tries from the Hurricanes ensured a comprehensive 56-21 win over the Brumbies in Hamilton on Friday.credit: sanzaarADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Super Rugby 2017 Related Articles 200 WEEKS AGO Western Force axed from Super Rugby 200 WEEKS AGO Compilation of the best tries in Super Rugby… 201 WEEKS AGO Crusaders beat Lions to claim eighth Super… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

IMA to host annual symposium

first_img Grace Kathleen Henry Pinterest WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Home Local News IMA to host annual symposium Pinterest Local News IMA to host annual symposium ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ Facebookcenter_img Previous articleTwo arrested following Snap chat threatNext articleChurch and altar dedication admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter OC employee of the year always learning 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School By admin – January 12, 2018 Interdenominational Ministers Alliance of Midland has scheduled the seventh annual Community Education Symposium from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 20 at Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, 410 S. Calhoun St., Midland.There will be a variety of presentations from community professionals and experts. Guest speakers include Orlando Riddick, Roy Nelson, Angela Joiner, John Love and Gavan Norris.Admission is free. Lunch provided. Call 432-978-8734. Twitter Fruit Salad to Die ForTexas Fried ChickenHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Securitization of Reperforming Loans Gives Fannie Mae Options

first_img Share Save Tagged with: Fannie Mae Mortgage-Backed Securities Reperforming Loans Securitization Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Related Articles Later this year, Fannie Mae will begin securitizing reperforming mortgage loans (RPLs) on its balance sheet, according to an announcement from Fannie Mae on Monday.Reperforming mortgage loans are those that were delinquent at one point but subsequently returned to current status. Fannie Mae completed 6,592 loan modifications in February; the reperforming loans that will be packaged for securitization include loans that returned to current status either with or without the help of a loan modification, according to Fannie Mae.The securitization of these loans gives Fannie Mae the option of further reducing its retained mortgage portfolio by selling the mortgage-backed securities to investors. The portfolio contracted at an annual rate of 27.8 percent in February, which translated to a month-over-month decline of more than $11 billion down to a value of about $337.2 billion by the end of the month, according to Fannie Mae’s February 2016 Monthly Volume Summary. Fannie Mae’s mortgage portfolio has contracted in all but four months since June 2010; at the beginning of that stretch, the amount of unpaid principal balance (UPB) of the loans in the portfolio was $818 billion.“With these securitizations we’ll have more flexibility to manage our risk and reduce the size of our portfolio,” said Bob Ives, VP of Retained Portfolio Asset Management at Fannie Mae. “Over the long run, these securitizations can benefit investors, Fannie Mae, and taxpayers.”Fannie Mae has announced enhanced loan level disclosures for this population of RPLs; the enhanced disclosures will include updated credit scores at issuance, delinquency status, and modification details. Fannie Mae will also provide rounded unpaid principal balances for this round of RPLs due to borrower privacy considerations, and the early notification of the program is designed to allow market participants to prepare their systems to accept new data, according to Fannie Mae.Click here for more information on Fannie Mae’s mortgage-backed securities. Securitization of Reperforming Loans Gives Fannie Mae Options Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Clinton Blames Foreclosure Crisis on Republicans Next: Counsel’s Corner: Here is What Smaller Title Companies are Up Against  Print This Post Fannie Mae Mortgage-Backed Securities Reperforming Loans Securitization 2016-04-25 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Securitization of Reperforming Loans Gives Fannie Mae Options About Author: Brian Honea Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago April 25, 2016 2,990 Views Subscribelast_img read more

Brexit on the edge

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. It’s been more than three years since the U.K.’s historic vote to leave the European Union, known as Brexit, and the stalemate over how and when (and even, still, whether) to exit has consumed political bandwidth and a few careers. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, a fervent Brexit supporter who was pressing to hit an Oct. 31 deadline for departure, presented Parliament with a new withdrawal agreement he etched with EU leadership late last week and pressed for a vote, which was denied. House of Commons Speaker John Bercow also refused Monday to allow a quick balloting on whether to give the deal a tentative blessing. To gain some insight into what happens next, the Gazette spoke with Lord Peter Ricketts, a former Fisher Family Fellow of the Future of Diplomacy Project at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, a highly respected diplomat, and a life peer in Britain’s House of Lords.Q&ALord Peter RickettsGAZETTE: Where do things stand?Ricketts: Johnson tried to [push] for a vote on his deal in principle with the EU by the House of Commons on Saturday. MPs declined and effectively said that they needed to study the legislation in the normal way. The government tried a second time [Monday] and again, that was rebuffed. What will happen now is the government will introduce a 100-page-plus bill which will go to what they call “second reading” in the House of Commons [Tuesday]. That is where we’ll get the first indication of: Is there a majority in principle for Boris Johnson’s deal? Because if it passes second reading, it will spend two or three days in committee stage in the Commons, with a very tough, time-tabling motion, which will limit the time for discussion. That will be controversial, but that’s what the government will try to do. Then it will come to the [House of] Lords this coming weekend with the aim of getting it back to the Commons and ironing out any differences in time for the thing to become law by, say, Tuesday or Wednesday next week, and for Britain to leave [the EU] on the 31st. It’s an incredibly ambitious timetable, but given that there is quite a strong mood here now that, after three years or more, Britain has got to take some decision or other, I think, probably Parliament will try to meet that deadline if the government can show Tuesday that there is a majority [that favors it] in principle.GAZETTE: Which side has the momentum in their favor?Ricketts: This is the closest that Britain has come to a proposition that can get a majority of support in the House of Commons. Theresa May’s previous attempts at this fell short by a long way. The Saturday vote was not so much on the substance of the bill; it was more about not having enough time and being rushed into a decision. Now that the government is proposing some time to look at the draft law, I think they have a reasonable chance of having a small majority in favor. And if that’s the case, then the Lords certainly won’t stand in the way because we’re not the elected chamber. So there is now a reasonable chance Britain will leave on the 31st with this deal. If that doesn’t happen, then there will be a further delay because it’s very clear that there is no majority for leaving into the chaos of a no-deal Brexit and so, if this deal falls short, I think there will be a delay, possibly for several months, to give time for either a general election or a second referendum and to reshuffle the political cards, so to speak.GAZETTE: What about Johnson’s political future? Is this make or break?Ricketts: He has staked his reputation on getting a deal on the 31st of October. I think if he winds up getting a deal, but it’s slightly after the 31st, that isn’t a great problem for him. He would then go for an election as soon as he could. The Labour Party is in rather a weak state, and Johnson would try to capitalize on an impression that he had sorted out the mess; he had delivered a deal, delivered on the referendum, and he should therefore have a majority to govern. If this deal falls apart and he’s forced to go into a referendum or an election having failed to get a deal, that is a serious setback for him because he’s been a one-issue prime minister; he’s not really put any focus on anything else. So, yes, it’s high stakes for Johnson and his party and equally for the Labour Party, as well.GAZETTE: Has the possibility of a second referendum or election substantially increased?Ricketts: The polls have consistently shown over the last six or nine months that people would like to have a second opportunity to express an opinion because everyone’s learned a lot more about what leaving the EU means. I think there is a growing momentum behind the idea of a second referendum. I would say it’s not really represented in the House of Commons, where there’s an awful lot of people still against it, people who worry about unpopular reaction from those who voted leave once and then find, three years later, they’re being asked to vote again. The other alternative is to have a general election — the political parties might prefer that. The problem with a general election, of course, is that then the Brexit issue gets intertwined with all the other issues in voters’ minds — the economy, the personalities of the leaders, and all that. Whereas a second referendum keeps the focus on: Do you like this deal or would you prefer to stay in the EU? I can’t predict how that will turn out. Looking at the political landscape, it’s more likely to be a general election than a referendum, but this is a very volatile and unpredictable moving target here and if this deal is voted down in the House of Commons, with all the anger that will go with that, it may be that the mood will swing toward a second referendum. There’s certainly quite a lot of support for that. Definitely.GAZETTE: The EU indicated Monday that another extension will be granted, if necessary. What is its calculus?Ricketts: From the European side, big picture, everyone is fed up, tired of Brexit. They want to get on with their new agenda. They’ve got a new commission taking over on the 1st of November, a new parliament, new set of issues to grapple with. Everyone would like to see the Brexit issue out of the way, but no one wants to take the historic responsibility of being seen pushing Britain out because that’s the kind of thing that could leave bruises for decades to come. There are two scenarios — if the House of Commons is struggling along on the point of reaching agreement on legislation [and] just needs a few more days, that sort of short, technical extension would be no problem on the European side. If the thing falls apart, I think the Europeans would prefer to give us the time to sort ourselves out and think again rather than pulling the plug on the whole process and saying it’s all over now.GAZETTE: How will the agreement affect the U.K. economy and national security?Ricketts: There is a difference between leaving with a deal and leaving with no deal. If it was this deal, it at least gives a transition period, which is more than a year. It could be extended, where things stay as they are effectively while a new relationship is worked out. That’s good for business. But if it turns out that the longer-term destination is a more distant one between Britain and the single market, then that is going to be bad for business because regulatory barriers, potentially tariff barriers and others, will go up in due course. A bit the same on security: If it’s a deal, there’s time to renegotiate Britain being involved in all the different security instruments that the EU has — shared databases, extradition agreements, police alerting systems — a whole range of cooperation instruments that the law-enforcement systems use a lot. If we have a year or two to stitch that back together again, that will avoid the knife edge that people worry about. But if there’s a no deal in all those areas, then there’s a much more immediate and more disruptive impact on both businesses and on security and all our other interests.Bottom line, in whatever kind of Brexit it is, Britain will wind up being worse off because the best possible relationship we have with the European Union is the one we have now. Any deal will mean less trade, less investment, a more difficult and clunky relationship on security. The Bank of England forecast is that, with a deal, Britain might lose, for example, 6 or 7 percentage points of GDP looking five to eight years ahead. And with no deal, it could be 8 to 10 percentage points [less] overall after 10 years than it would be if it stayed in the EU. So there’s a serious economic impact. There’s going to be a reduction in the capacity to work with other European security agencies, which overall increase the risks here. The areas that are least affected are intelligence cooperations, which don’t go through the EU. On defense, NATO, the relationship with the U.S., is our paramount defense alliance, and that is not affected. The amount of EU defense is pretty modest. So in defense and security, there’s least impact. Foreign policy, on the economic agenda and the law enforcement agenda, I would say, is the biggest impact.GAZETTE: How does this agreement benefit the EU?Ricketts: I don’t think it benefits anyone. I think it’s a lose-lose. For individual EU countries, they will see some advantages. For example, our French friends will see opportunities to draw jobs away from London and into Paris because banks will need to have operations that are licensed to operate in the European Union, so there’ll be some job opportunities. But overall, there will be an impact on the European economy as well, but it will be less than for the U.K. Perhaps the biggest impact on the European economy is to lose one of the three big players in the EU, leaving only two, Germany and France, who have their own differences. Losing the country that is perhaps the most globally focused, with the most global interests, the biggest defense player in Europe, the country with a historic investment in trading relationships around the world — losing that country out of the EU will change things inside the EU. It may reduce the EU’s weight in the world, its appetite to be a global political player, it leaves France as the only really global country in the EU. So I think it has geopolitical impact on the EU in the way the EU operates in the world.GAZETTE: What’s the next thing to watch for to gauge where this all may be going?Ricketts: The very important vote in the House of Commons on the second reading of this legislation will be critical tomorrow. Because if that passes second reading, it means Britain is on course to agree to this bill, whether by the 31st of October or slightly later, and leave the EU in an orderly way or be it to a destination that some of us do not much fancy. If the vote tomorrow does not pass, then Boris Johnson is in a real mess, then I think we’re in for a longer delay and it’s probably a general election in a very chaotic, political context.This interview has been edited for clarity and condensed for length.last_img read more

Central America: USAID Sends Aid to Countries Devastated by Hurricanes Eta and Iota

first_imgBy Eduardo Szklarz/Diálogo November 20, 2020 The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) deployed a Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) to respond to the destruction caused by two consecutive hurricanes in Central America.Hurricane Iota made landfall in Nicaragua on November 17 with winds of 250 km/h, less than two weeks after Tropical Storm Eta left at least 200 people dead and missing in the region, in addition to displacing thousands.“The United States, through USAID, was already providing assistance after Hurricane Eta made landfall, and is now allocating an additional $17 million in vital aid for people affected by both hurricanes in Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua,” USAID said in a statement.The Guatemalan Army’s 6th Infantry Brigade supported the evacuation of families affected by the constant rains caused by Hurricane Iota. (Photo: Guatemalan Army)This new funding includes up to $8.5 million for Honduras, $7 million for Guatemala, and $1.5 million for Nicaragua to provide shelter, food, hygiene supplies, relief items, and protection for the most vulnerable people, USAID said.In Honduras, the Armed Forces’ Peacekeeping Operations Unit (UOMP, in Spanish) distributed more than 25,000 gallons of water to citizens affected by the hurricanes.“The UOMP has also led preventive evacuations, street cleaning, and damage assessment,” the Honduran Armed Forces reported.For its part, the Guatemalan Army intensified assistance in devastated and at-risk areas.“We have approximately 7,000 men and women members of the Army involved in response tasks that include searching for people, evacuation, and logistics to move humanitarian aid to the affected communities,” Rubén Téllez, spokesman for the Guatemalan Ministry of Defense, told Agencia Guatemalteca de Noticias.The United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO) warned of the catastrophic consequences of Hurricane Iota, this year’s 13th tropical storm in Central America.“We are running out of superlatives for this Atlantic hurricane season. It’s a record in every sense of the word,” WMO spokesperson Clare Nullis said in a statement.According to Nullis, the number and strength of hurricanes in 2020 are due to several causes, such as the absence of an El Niño event, ocean temperature, and atmospheric patterns — all factors that occur in an era of climate change.last_img read more

Briton John cops first-ever Bartica Cycling Meet

first_img… Georgetown cyclists dominateUNITED We Stand Cycling Club’s (UWSCC) youngster, Briton John, shone the brightest in the brilliant morning sunshine in the town which is called the ‘Gateway to the Interior’, Bartica, to win the feature event of the town’s first-ever cycling road race.A result of the Mayor and City Council’s collaboration with the Guyana Cycling Federation (GCF), the cycling meet saw cyclists from Georgetown and as far as Berbice assemble to compete in the various categories.David Hicks was the top Juveniles cyclist with an impressive performance.The feature 35-lap event, which started at the corner of First and Third Avenue, proceeded south along First Avenue, turned right into Sixth Street, left into Fourth Avenue, left into Eighth Street then left into Second Avenue to complete a lap, John managed to outride and out-manoeuvre the other seasoned cyclists.He took a lead midway into the race and never looked back – his youthful energy and enthusiasm winning out in the end.The biggest challenge for most of the cyclists was the hilly terrain which put question marks over the various cyclists’ fitness levels.John rode well to cross the finish line in a time of two hours 58.86 seconds to grab the champion’s trophy and the corresponding cash prize of $150 000.Meanwhile Curtis Dey also rode well to finish second while third to sixth places went to Rastaff Oselmo, Michael Anthony, Paul DeNobrega and Marcus Keiler in that order.In the Veterans category Segun Hubbard surprised Junior Niles to cop that event with the latter settling for second while Raymond Newton placed third.It was an exciting three-way battle in the Juveniles event, with David Hicks prevailing while Sherwin Sampson settled for second with Steve Bhimsim coming in third.Over in the Mountain Bike race, things got a bit sticky with usual top podium finisher, Ozia McAulay, (second place) conceding first place to Shane Boodram while Jamari Sharpe finished third.In the female event, Shenika Teixeira continued her dominance on the distaff side by winning that race comfortably ahead of Felina Stephens.Cash totalling over $400 000 was given away at the historic event, along with other incentives. The top six seniors, top three juniors and veterans were all recipients of prizes.last_img read more

Australia visa scandal: Why it’s hard to trust Akufo-Addo to punish culprits

first_imgGhana has a rich history of sporting scandals that have brought disgrace to the nation at international level.We’ve profiled some of the most notorious of them (click here to read), but what all of them have had in common is how successive governments have failed to punish culprits for political expediency.Politics pervades every aspect of Ghanaian society, and to think a sector as politically lucrative as sports will be spared represents the height of naiveté.Sports is an instrument of political influence which is used in diverse ways to further the cause of political entities. The phenomenon is hardly limited to Ghana or Africa. The difference, however, is the level of abuse which ultimately result in disgrace and shame for the country.A lot of decisions in Ghana sports are tainted with political considerations to the detriment of the sector. The shame at Brazil 2014, when Ghana airlifted more than $3 million for Black Stars players and officials, and indeed the other tournaments could have been avoided had laid down structures been allowed to work.Now that the nation is reeling from yet another one in the shape of the Australia visa scandal, where investigations have started into how dozens of Ghanaians tried to illegally exploit the just-ended Commonwealth Games for their own ends, can we trust the President to finish what he’s started?  How we dealt with Brazil – a reminderThe outrage after the Brazil 2014 airlifting fiasco was palpable for two reasons: the GFA/Black Stars players seeming lack of patriotism and the political dealings which contributed to a botched football campaign. The Justice Dzamefe Presidential commission of Inquiry was instituted by a Constitutional Instrument (CI 82) to, among other things, look into the preparation of the Black Stars and the lapses that culminated in Ghana’s early exit from the tournament.For four months the commission sat. It interviewed 87 witnesses, and presented a report to the President, a further two months later. Then President, John Mahama, promised to work on the recommendations, but that promise was received with skepticism. Failure to sack Elvis Afriyie Ankrah, the man under whose watch the entire World Cup saga unfolded did the government of the day and the country a huge disservice.Long story short, the John Mahama administration issued a White Paper on the Dzamefe Commission report, locked and forgot about it. By December 2016 when his government were voted out, the report was but a memory. Can Akufo-Addo be trusted to crack the whip?The ruling administration has pontificated protection of the public purse by rooting out corruption, with the newly appointed Special Prosecutor Martin Amidu as its poster boy. Nana Akufo-Addo is a man who has long had a reputation for being intolerant towards corruption.It was no surprise that his first response to the latest shame at the Commonwealth Games in Australia was to suspend the Deputy Sports Minister Pius Hadzide.President of the Ghana Olympic Committee, Ben Nunoo Mensah; the Board Chairman of the National Sports Authority (NSA), Kwadwo Baah Agyeman, and the Chef-de-Mission for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, Mohammed Sahnoon were recalled from the Games to assist the Criminal Investigation Department in a probe.Ordinarily the President’s response should inspire confidence of an end to this canker, and although some have lauded the move, many more still are skeptical. I’m one of those who is not overly excited by the suspension of Hadzide, at least until the Police CID conclude their investigations and the real culprits, which include people from the sports ministry and the NSA, have been made to face the full rigours of the law. We’ve been here beforeThe Kufuor administration prosecuted and jailed Mallam Issah, then sports minister, in 2001.The conspiracy theories vary depending on who’s speaking. What is clear was that Mallam Issah was not ‘one of their own’. He was a member of the People’s National Convention (PNC) and was co-opted into the NPP administration under the President’s all-inclusive government policy, which also saw the CPP’s Dr. Papa Kwesi Nduom made Energy and Public Sector Reform Minister.Issah has always maintained his innocence and insists he was framed by elements within the Kufuor administration with the connivance of the then President.The John Mahama administration moved Elvis Afriyie Ankrah from the sports ministry to the presidency when Ankrah was implicated by the Dzamefe Commission, a move which afforded him a safe haven. It shielded him from being dealt with by the law. Worlanyo Agra, implicated in a probe into stinking money guzzling in 2011, continues to walk a free man despite been culpable for several breaches of the country’s procurement laws.The President’s current response is consistent with what we’ve seen in recent years. The various political regimes tend to shield ‘their own’ in matters like these.If there’s a reason Ghana continues to be the subject of ridicule and shame on the global stage it is because successive governments have failed to crack the whip when situations have called for it.A missed opportunity The President will look back at an utterance he made in January and admit it was a grave error.At the Presidential Encounter, Asempa FM’s Patrick Osei-Agyeman (aka Countryman Songo) asked the head of state what he planned to do about the World Cup’s Commission of Inquiry report.“I have forgotten about the 2014 paper…it has not been very much on my radar,” the president confessed. With the current nonsense from Australia threatening to mar his zero tolerance of corruption quest, Nana Addo will be the first to admit that, perhaps, implementing the recommendations of the Dzamefe Commission would have forestalled this visa scandal.Implementation of the recommendations made by the Dzamefe Commission, one of many from the several scandals the country has been engulfed in, would have inspired confidence in the actions by his excellency today, in response to Ghana’s latest shame. At the moment it looks like business as usual…until those found culpable stand in the witness box of a law court to prove their innocence. If it’s some of ‘their own’, that would be massive political points for the regime.But they never touch their own, do they?—last_img read more