Governor Wolf: Restore Pennsylvania Would Help Remediate Contaminants in Pennsylvania Schools

first_imgGovernor Wolf: Restore Pennsylvania Would Help Remediate Contaminants in Pennsylvania Schools Infrastructure,  Press Release,  Restore Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA – Governor Tom Wolf toured the John H. Taggart School in Philadelphia today to see progress on removing contaminants which can cause serious health problems. The governor also outlined how Restore Pennsylvania, the most aggressive infrastructure proposal in generations, would help Pennsylvania schools to address lead and other contaminants.“Our children deserve to learn in healthy and safe classrooms,” said Governor Wolf. “Parents and teachers should not have to worry about the health risks of contaminants, like lead paint and dust in schools.“The school district is working to make the buildings safe from lead, but we must do more. Restore Pennsylvania is the boldest infrastructure plan in generations. It could provide more funding so we can continue to remove the danger of contaminants in our schools and make our classrooms safe for students and teachers.”Governor Wolf’s proposed Restore Pennsylvania plan is funded by monetizing a commonsense severance tax. Over the next four years, $4.5 billion would be provided for high-impact projects throughout the commonwealth. The investment would help communities address needs to remove lead paint, protect against flash flooding, combat blight, and expand high-speed internet and green infrastructure. All projects that communities need but lack the necessary funding to complete.The governor was joined on the tour and at a press conference by Senators Larry Farnese and Vince Hughes, School District of Philadelphia Superintendent Dr. William R. Hite along with other district and community officials. The tour included a school hallway with flaking lead paint and a classroom with a completed project.“The effects of lead exposure can be dangerous, debilitating and deadly – and there is no cure,” said Sen. Larry Farnese. “Philadelphia schools and residences are rife with deteriorating lead pipes and peeling lead-based paint. This problem will only get worse if we don’t take action now.”“We won’t stop fighting until our schools are healthy and safe for every student,” said Sen. Hughes. “Philadelphia’s lead problem has been well documented, and it is time we fully take on this major public health crisis and provide the resources that will make a difference. I support and applaud this proposal to clean up our toxic schools, as well as the other high-impact projects Restore Pennsylvania aims to address.”Last June, the governor announced a $7.6 million state grant to help fund the school district’s $15.6 million project to address lead paint, mold and asbestos in dozens of schools. Approximately 90 percent of the city’s schools were built before 1978, when the federal government banned the residential use of lead-based paint. Lead from paint, including lead-contaminated dust, is one of the most common causes of lead poisoning.Lead Paint RemediationRestore Pennsylvania will fund expanded efforts to remove lead and other contaminants from communities. Studies continue to find elevated lead levels in blood tests of Pennsylvania’s youngest residents, a result of Pennsylvania’s older housing stock, 70 percent of which was built before the 1978 ban on lead paint. Long-term exposure to lead paint can have devastating developmental consequences including lowered-IQ, memory problems, and other neurological and behavioral effects.Flooding Prevention and RecoveryRestore Pennsylvania will provide funding for flood prevention that will protect against severe weather and save homes and businesses in flood prone areas across the state. Restore Pennsylvania will provide funding to help towns and cities prepare for flooding and severe weather, upgrade flood walls and levees, replace high-hazard dams, and conduct stream restoration and maintenance. Restore Pennsylvania will also establish a disaster relief trust fund to assist individuals who suffer losses that are not compensated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency or other programs.BlightRestore Pennsylvania will increase resources for addressing blight by providing financial resources at the local level to establish land banks and acquire and demolish blighted buildings in order to create new development opportunities or provide new green space. The funding will be administered by entities established by the legislature as land banks or demolition funds.BroadbandRestore Pennsylvania will provide funding to completely bridge the digital divide in every community in Pennsylvania, making Pennsylvania a better place to work, do business, and live. Grants will be available to support installation of infrastructure to bring high speed internet to every corner of the commonwealth. Funding will support every phase of the process from feasibility testing to connection.View the full Restore Pennsylvania plan. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img March 21, 2019last_img read more

Clonoulty Rossmore aim to continue winning ways

first_imgHaving beat Drom & Inch in the group stages of the County Senior Hurling Championship quite comprehensively, Clonoulty Rossmore face Seamie Callanan’s club again – this time at the Quarter Final stage.They play in the double header in Semple Stadium on Sunday, with the game getting underway at 6 o clock.Having won the West final last weekend, Clonoulty will be going into the game on a high. Clonoulty Rossmore manager Philip Quirke says they’re ready for the battle.last_img

Huskies win wild one in Beaverlodge

first_imgThe Huskies had to work for it, but dug out of a hole, and won a wild one on Friday night.Playing in the tight confines of the Beaverlodge Arena, the Huskies took an early lead, on a Dylan Apsassin goal just 20 seconds in.  Aaron Dumas scored with Beaverlodge on a two man advantage 6 minutes later, before Robbie Sidhu regained the Huskies lead with 3 minutes remaining in the first.The second period was when the drama really began.  It started with a Nick Fitzpatrick marker seven minutes in. 15 minutes into the second, Cody Anderson added a controversial goal, when Huskies starter Ty Gullickson was knocked down.  Anderson slid the puck into the net from the side boards, and after a brief discussion, the officials decided the goal would stand, despite protests from the Huskies bench. – Advertisement -The Huskies were reeling, and the Blades capitalized.  Tyrell Jones soon added another Beaverlodge goal to make it 4-2, on another scramble in front.  The Huskies added a greasy goal of their own, when Jesse Disher knocked in a loose puck on a goal-mouth pile-up.  But before the period was out, Damien Kappo again beat Gullickson, to make it 5-3 Blades after 40 minutes.The game was still within reach, but the Huskies were behind, and to make matters worse, Ty Gullickson was unable to continue, diagnosed with a minor concussion on the Cody Anderson goal.  Payden Wongstedt was also lost for the night, after he blocked a shot with the outside of his foot, and left the game.  The second period had seen a number of wild scrambles and dogpiles in both creases.  “That’s the game in Beaverlodge” said coach Bob Kalb after the game, referring to the small ice rink, and game plan of the Blades.  “They play a scrambly game.”  Kalb says his team is a puck possession and speed team, but on this night, they were able to adjust, and fight back in the third.The final period didn’t start well, with Taylor Jones beating Garrett Muir short-side just 1:20 in.  It was the first shot Muir had faced, but he seldom saw the puck for the remainder of the period, as the Huskies began to pressure the Blades, and fight their way back in. Advertisement Brighton Campbell got the ball rolling, when he finished off a passing play that saw the puck move from Darcy Bell to Dylan Apsassin to Cody Kalb to Campbell in a matter of seconds.  Campbell beat Beaverlodge goaltender Brett Hommy with a snap-shot to the top corner.  “I’d had a few shots before that, and kept hitting their goalie in the chest,” Campbell said afterwards. “I pictured my Grandpa telling me to go to the top corner … so I thought about it, shot it, and it got through,” he said.Cam MacKinnon got the Huskies within one with six minutes remaining, and less than two minutes later, Campbell scored his second, when he knocked rebound past Brett Hommy while being knocked down in front, and the Huskies had tied the game.  And finally, with less then 90 seconds remaining, Cam MacKinnon’s second of the game gave the Huskies the lead. The Blades seemed defeated, and after losing the lead, were unable to muster any offence, and the Huskies escaped with a 7-6 win.Brighton Campbell earned player of the game honours, while Cam MacKinnon also scored two third period goals, including the winner.  Also impressive in the third was Darcy Bell, playing his first regular game for the Huskies.  Bell assisted on all four third period goals, and on a night where the small ice surface seemed clogged all night, found room to make some key breakout passes that allowed the Huskies to attack the goal.  “He’s really calm with the puck, and he sees the ice really well” said coach Kalb said of Bell after the game.  Kalb also spoke highly of Campbell – who is playing for the Huskies at just 17 years old.  “Brighton has impressed me since the first week of training camp” Kalb said, suggesting the rookie could move on to play Junior ‘A’ hockey. Advertisement After a mediocre performance from his team last weekend, Kalb was also much happier with his team’s effort on the night.  “Even when we were down, it wasn’t because we were playing terribly” he said, adding “it was a good character win for us.”Click here to listen to a highlights package from Friday’s game: [asset|aid=1946|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=f451c4f6f864c97bfebc4b1786339cab-Huskies win 7-6 over Beaverlodge Blades_1_Pub.mp3]The Huskies will hope to keep their momentum going when they play in Grande Prairie on Saturday night. The game starts at 8:30 (7:30 PST), and will be broadcast live on MooseFM.last_img read more