After being relegated to the sidelines Etienne Sabino is making noise on

Redshirt junior linebacker Etienne Sabino had an interesting road to a starting job for the Ohio State defense. After Sabino lost the job to current senior Andrew Sweat last spring, he and the coaches decided a redshirt might be in the his best interest. The decision was difficult for Sabino to cope with. “I would say it was probably one of the hardest years of my life,” Sabino said. “The toughest part was sitting on the sideline on Saturday and not being able to play.” Injuries to OSU’s defense and special teams units almost forced Sabino to give up his redshirt and play, but the team held out, giving him more time to grow. Despite his yearlong hiatus being difficult, Sabino said it helped him develop as a player. “I think I really got a better grasp of the defense as a whole,” he said. “As far as with me redshirting last year, I really think that helped me in that sense.” With another year in the system, Sabino is projected to be a starter at middle linebacker this season, replacing last year’s leading tackler, Brian Rolle, who recorded 76 tackles. Sabino said learning the defensive schemes has helped him progress as a linebacker. “It actually slows the game down for you when you’re out there and not thinking, and you can just react and know what you have,” he said. “It just helps your game and your overall football knowledge.” As a junior, Sabino is expected to take on a leadership role for the Buckeye defense, and junior defensive back Orhian Johnson said he thinks Sabino has blossomed into someone the defense can rely on. “He’s definitely stepped up into that leadership role,” Johnson said. “He’s been showing his dedication a lot, and I just really feel like he’s ready to let it all go and go out and perform.” Junior defensive lineman John Simon said Sabino’s presence on the defense makes the group better. “He’s a physical player and he gets the whole defense riled up,” Simon said. “We love having him out there when he’s making plays for us.” Spring practice has proven Sabino is ready to contribute to the defense, Simon said. “Right now is probably the best I’ve felt,” Sabino said, “and I feel very comfortable out there.” Johnson said he thinks Sabino has always had the talent but that he has become even better this spring. “We saw bright spots for him in his future,” Johnson said, “but he’s definitely stepped up a lot.” Even with the progress he has made in the system and the talent he has, Sabino said there is room to improve. “I’m really just trying to work on my little techniques and really just trying to get better in that sense,” he said. “I’m just focused on every day — I’m trying to get better every day.” With a young defense and the departure of starting linebackers Rolle and Ross Homan, Sabino said he is working to be a force on this year’s version of the Silver Bullets. “I’m just trying to be a playmaker,” he said, “and just help this team win in any way that I can.” read more

Atomtronic transistor and diode could advance quantum computing

first_img Can alkaline earth metals be used in quantum computing? (PhysOrg.com) — What if atoms could be used to perform the functions currently the province of electronic devices? The goal of atomtronics is to do just that by creating analogues to the common items found in electronic devices. Ron Pepino, a graduate student at JILA and the University of Colorado, believes that he and his colleagues have found a way to create the atomtronic versions of diode and transistor circuits. The work of Pepino, Cooper, Anderson and Holland is described in Physical Review Letters: “Atomtronic Circuits of Diodes and Transistors.” Citation: Atomtronic transistor and diode could advance quantum computing (2009, October 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-atomtronic-transistor-diode-advance-quantum.html “In our work, we create a one-to-one analogy between conventional electronic circuits and atoms trapped in optical lattices,” Pepino tells PhysOrg.com. “In this analogy, the current carriers — the electrons — are replaced with neutral, ultracold atoms, the semiconductor material that the electrons traverse is replaced with an optical lattice, and the electric potential difference — which induces the flow of electrons around the circuit — is replaced by a chemical potential difference”“The dynamics of atoms in optical lattices, which are basically crystals of light, have been studied both theoretically and experimentally for many years now. We add to this field by theoretically demonstrating that the electronic properties of the diode and transistor can be observed in specifically tailored optical lattices,” Pepino continues.The team at JILA believes that it is possible to emulate the behavior of a semiconductor diode in these atomic systems. “We have predicted that you can take the optical lattice, manipulate its experimentally-tunable parameters in a specific way, and recover diode-like phenomena,” Pepino explains, “Our simulations show that this augmented optical lattice will allow atoms to flow across it from left to right, for example, but forbids the atoms to traverse the lattice going the other way. We have modeled this, and we think it might work.”Pepino and his peers have also modeled an atomtronic transistor. “All modern electronics contain transistors; they are the fundamental building blocks of electronics and computers. Naturally, we want an atomtronic version.” The transistor designed by Pepino and his colleagues exhibits on/off switching behavior, and acts as an amplifier. By configuring the optical lattice in a manner discussed in their article, they show that it is possible to recover the characteristics of the conventional electronic transistor in the atomic world. He points out that atomtronics probably won’t replace electronics. “Atoms are sluggish compared to electrons, and that means that you probably won’t see atomtronics replace current electronic devices. What atomtronics might be useful for is the field of quantum information.” Because electrons lose any possible initial quantum state as they bounce around through the energy dissipating semiconductor or metallic systems, they are ill-equipped for quantum computing. “In quantum computing, you store a quantum state on an object, perform operations on the object and then read out the final state. If the system is not coherent, the initial stored information is lost,” Pepino points out. “Atoms trapped in optical lattices have been considered extensively for specific quantum computing schemes due to their inherent energy conserving characteristics. The dynamics of our atomtronic devices would be coherent and potentially useful in quantum computing.” He also suggests that there is the possibility that atomtronics could be useful in obtaining sensitive measurements. At the very least, he concludes, “atomtronic systems provide a nice test of fundamental concepts in condensed matter physics.”While these ideas have been modeled, they have yet to be built. Pepino says that an effort is under way to set up experiments that could provide a proof of principle for the work being done at JILA and the University of Colorado by experimental collaborator and co-author Dana Anderson.More information: Pepino, et. al. “Atomtronic Circuits of Diodes and Transistors,” Physical Review Letters (2009). Available online: https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2020/IMG3010.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

Russian magic once again

Delhiites, it is time to rediscover the romance of Russia that Bollywood once created soon after Independence. So from Russian theatre to ballet, you can catch them all in your city itself. And all this, thanks to a protocol that was signed on Monday between the Indian Council for Cultural Relations [ICCR] and the Ministry of Russian Federation. As a result, a festival that will showcase Russian culture in India will be held later this month and will go on till early November. Not just Delhi, those living in Mumbai and Bangalore will also get a chance to be a part of this cultural extravaganza. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’A total of 65 artistes and delegates will travel from Russia for the festival and they will be provided with hospitality by ICCR. A similar cultural programme will take place in Russia next year.In India though, expect performances by soloists of the Bolshoi, Marinsky and Mikhailovsky Theatres, St Petersburg Folk ensemble Barynya, the troupe of the Russian Academic Youth Theatre and a photo exhibition.The two-day festival in Delhi will see joint performances by folk dance ensemble Barynya and the State Academic Youth Theatre [RAMT]. The next day, there will be a performance of Russian Bolshoi Ballet and Marinsky and Mikhailovsky Theatres, St Petersburg. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixBarynya originally is a Russian folk dance accompanied by music. The word barynya was used by simple folk as a form of addressing a woman of a higher class. The Barynya dance is an alternation of chastushkas and frenetic dancing. The dance doesn’t adhere to a choreography and consists mainly of fancy stomping and traditional Russian squatwork — knee bending. Go for this.DETAILWhat: Barynya and State Academic Youth Theatre [RAMT] When: 29 October At: FICCI Auditorium, What: Bolshoi Ballet and Marinsky and Mikhailovsky Theatres When: 1 NovemberAt: Siri Fort AuditoriumTimings: 7 pm read more

Rep Rendon invites residents to March office hours

first_img Categories: Daire Rendon News 21Feb Rep. Rendon invites residents to March office hours State Rep. Daire Rendon of Lake City will sponsor local office hours for the month of March.“Office hours are an opportunity for residents to meet face-to-face with me and ask questions, offer ideas or share thoughts regarding state government,” Rep. Rendon said.The representative will be available at the following times and locations:Friday, March 2Crawford County: 9 to 10 a.m. at Goodale’s Bakery, 500 Norway St. in Grayling; andKalkaska County: Noon to 1 p.m. at Trout Town Tavern & Eatery, 306 Elm St. in Kalkaska. No appointments are necessary to attend office hours. Those who are unable to attend, but would still like to speak with the representative, may contact her Lansing office at (517) 373-3817 or [email protected]### Monday, March 5Ogemaw County: 9 to 10 a.m. at West Branch Area Chamber of Commerce, 422 W. Houghton Ave. in West Branch;Roscommon County: Noon to 1 p.m. at Markey Township Hall, 4974 E. Houghton Lake Drive in Houghton Lake; andMissaukee County: 3 to 4 p.m. at Missaukee County Commission of Aging, 1980 S. Morey Road in Lake City.last_img read more