A journalist wanted by the police for having denounced police extortion

first_img RSF_en Help by sharing this information News Organisation November 27, 2020 Find out more April 22, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 A journalist wanted by the police for having denounced police extortion April 6, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa KenyaAfrica KenyaAfrica to go furthercenter_img Follow the news on Kenya Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has written to Alex Rono, head of the North-Eastern Provincial Police calling on him to reverse an order for the arrest of Victore Obure, the Garissa correspondent of the East African Standard. “He is a journalist who is simply carrying out his work. There can be no justification for ordering his arrest,” said RSF Secretary General Robert Ménard. “The fact that he has gone underground is a very alarming sign of the treatment meted out to journalists detained by the police. The Head of the police said in December 2000, however, that measures would be taken to ‘harmonise the relationship between the police and journalists’.” RSF has learned that Victor Obure, the Garissa correspondent of the East African Standard, has decided to go underground because of fears for his safety. According to police sources, the Criminal Investigation Department – CID – called for his arrest a week ago following an article which reported the extortion of thousands of shillings from the inhabitants of Garissa by police, during a crackdown on illegal immigrants in the city. RSF also gave a reminder that on 22 March 2002, The People Daily newspaper and its Chief Editor George Mbugguss, were ordered to pay 20 million Kenyan shillings (about 300,000 Euros), to Nicholas Biwott, Minister for Trade and the Interior, for “libel”. “The secret history of Moi-Nyache, an article published on 10 March 1999, claimed that Mr. Biwott, then Minister for the Eastern African Community, was involved in the controversial awarding of a tender for the construction of a hydro-electricity dam. The newspaper claimed that the “Turkwell Gorge” project had been awarded to a French company under dubious circumstances. News News Kenyan media group trolled by pro-ruling party activists Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent Receive email alerts Reports June 13, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Mayo Hernández tries to take his life, sees death as the only way out

first_img CubaAmericas to go further October 15, 2020 Find out more CubaAmericas Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders is extremely worried about the condition of Mario Enrique Mayo Hernández (photo), a journalist who has been detained since March 2003 and is serving a 20-year prison sentence. His wife and mother have reported that he tried to commit suicide twice and is still determined to end his life. The health of fellow-journalists Alfredo Manuel Pulido López (held like Mayo since March 2003) and Oscar Mario González (who was arrested in July) is also very worrying. RSF_en Organisation New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago October 12, 2018 Find out more Receive email alerts Follow the news on Cuba News News Reporters Without Borders today voiced deep concern about the condition of imprisoned journalist Mario Enrique Mayo Hernández after his wife and mother reported that he tried to commit suicide twice and is still determined to end his life. He has been detained since March 2003 and is serving a 20-year prison sentence.“Mayo cannot take any more, physically and mentally, nor can his family,” the press freedom organisation said. “Does death offer the only relief in Cuban prisons, as exiled journalist Raúl Rivero asked last week when fellow journalist Victor Rolando Arroyo Carmona was on hunger strike? We call on the Cuban authorities to free Mayo and all of the other 22 imprisoned journalists at once.”After many hours of wait and uncertainty, Mayo’s wife and mother were able to see him in Kilo 7 prison in Camagüey for about 30 minutes on 12 October. His wife, Maidelin Guerra, told Reporters Without Borders that he very debilitated, both physically and psychologically, and is determined to take his life.“He has written ‘Innocent. Freedom’ in large letters on his body with razor or a nail or something else he found, on his stomach, arms and face,” Guerra said. “He told us he would continue to write these words on himself until there was no more room and then he would commit suicide. He kept repeating to us, ‘I shouldn’t be here. I’ve done nothing.’ He cannot stand it any more.”Guerra added that the prison officials are “paving the way” by already disclaiming any responsibility in the event of Mayo’s death in prison. She said he should be receiving treatment but she had no way of verifying it. Mayo tried to take his life twice already by hanging himself with sheets or wire.Guerra also told Reporters Without Borders that Alfredo Manuel Pulido López, another journalist held at Kilo 7 prison, is confined to his bed. He is suffering from acute depression and migraines for which he needs to undergo tests. Arrested in the black spring of 2003 like Mayo, he is serving a 14-year prison sentence.Meanwhile, Oscar Mario González, who was arrested on 22 July, was hospitalised on 11 October. His wife, Mirta Wong, explained that during her most recent visits, he was suffering from memory loss and had difficulty putting sentences together. González is awaiting trial on charges that carry a possible 20-year prison sentence. News May 6, 2020 Find out more News October 14, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Mayo Hernández tries to take his life, sees death as the only way out Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internetlast_img read more

Where There’s Smoking Demand, There’s Defect Risk Fire

first_img  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Where There’s Smoking Demand, There’s Defect Risk Fire About Author: Brianna Gilpin Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Where There’s Smoking Demand, There’s Defect Risk Fire The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago 2017-06-28 Brianna Gilpin Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago June 28, 2017 1,074 Views Related Articles The May 2017 Index reveals an increase in frequency of defects, fraudulence, and misrepresentation in the information submitted in mortgage loan applications by 2.5 percent, compared to April 2017.According to a report by First American, the index estimates the level of defects in submitted mortgage loan applications processed by the First American’s FraudGuard system. The findings are determined based on the frequency that defect indicators are identified. The Defect Index moves higher as greater numbers of defect indicators are found—increases representing a rising level of loan application defects.The Defect Index increased by 13.7 percent since last year. Refinance transactions increased by 3 percent month-over-month with a 9.7 percent increase and purchase transactions rose 11.1 percent in the same time frame.Mark Fleming, First American’s Chief Economist said the Loan Application Defect Index is now reaching levels of risk not seen since 2015.“While risk is growing in both purchase and refinance transactions,” Fleming said, “it’s important to recognize that loan application defect, fraud, and misrepresentation risk remains below the peak reached in 2013.”Fleming said the purchase transaction risk is 13 percent below the peak and refinance transaction risk is 32 percent below.”The purchase-pivot in the housing market continues to add fuel to the fire of the overall level of application, defect, and fraud risk,” Fleming said.According to Fleming, this Loan Application Defect Risk is creating a “heat wave” that is destroying several Southern markets.McAllen, Texas ranked first followed by Charleston, South Carolina; Birmingham, Alabama; Knoxville, Tennessee; and Augusta, Georgia. Fleming calls these cities “hot spots” for loan defect risk getting “hotter,” as the risk in these markets is increasing significantly.The defect risk in each market has increased by a minimum of 10 percent in the past year, and southern markets are experiencing some of the strongest growth in housing demand as people seek the lower cost of living compared to northeastern and western markets, according to Fleming.“Where there’s smoking demand, the flames of defect risk typically follow,” Fleming said.According to First American, the next release of the Loan Application Defect Index will be posted the week of July 24, 2017. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Brianna Gilpin, Online Editor for MReport and DS News, is a graduate of Texas A&M University where she received her B.A. in Telecommunication Media Studies. Gilpin previously worked at Hearst Media, one of the nation’s leading diversified media and information services companies. To contact Gilpin, email [email protected] Previous: Lowest Home Appreciation in the U.S. Next: The Psychology Behind Why People Buy, And Where The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more