DONE DEAL: SINN FEIN/LABOUR/FIANNA FAIL PACT TO TAKE ON FINE GAEL OVER HOUSEHOLD TAX

first_imgENOUGH county councillors will vote today to enforce a ban on Donegal County Council officials from using personal data to track down people who haven’t paid the Household Charge, a councillor is hoping.Sinn Fein’s Jack Murray managed to read out his motion a fortnight ago before Fine Gael Mayor Noel McBride could stop him.That has meant the motion is on the agenda for today’s county council meeting. Cllr Murray says he now has the support of the independent councillors including Michael McBride, Labour’s Frank McBrearty and many of the Fianna Fail representatives.This will set a legal precedent in Donegal – if passed – where council civil servants will not be able to use utility bills and family welfare details to track down the estimated 70% of people in this county who have not paid the charge.Cllr Murray said: “I have personally contacted every single councillor and I am confident that the emergency motion I put to the council two weeks ago will now be voted on and will be carried.“I am hoping that this will set a precedent for other councils throughout the state to follow suit.” Cllr McBrearty is set to defy the Labour Party and support the Sinn Fein motion, calling for a review of the charge so that those who can’t pay don’t have to. DONE DEAL: SINN FEIN/LABOUR/FIANNA FAIL PACT TO TAKE ON FINE GAEL OVER HOUSEHOLD TAX was last modified: April 16th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Chelsea ‘face competition from Arsenal for Newcastle star’

first_imgChelsea face competition from Arsenal for the signing of Newcastle star Hatem Ben Arfa, the Daily Mirror say.The Magpies winger has attracted interest from Chelsea for some time, but it is suggested that Arsenal are now strong contenders to sign him.It is also claimed that Ben Arfa fears he would not play regularly if he were to move to Stamford Bridge.The Daily Express say Chelsea are to increase their bid for Wigan’s Victor Moses to £5.5m.The Sun suggest Wigan are prepared to double Moses’ wages in order to keep him.Meanwhile, QPR are in talks with Danny Murphy but face a fight with Blackburn for his signature, according to the Mirror.The veteran midfielder, whose Fulham contract expires this summer, played under R’s boss Mark Hughes when the Welshman was manager at Craven Cottage.It is claimed that Murphy has spoken to relegated Rovers about joining them on a two-year deal but will move to Rangers if they match the Championship side’s terms.The Daily Mail report that Fulham have offered £1.6m for Vitesse Arnhem left-back Alexander Buttner, have also shown interest in Sevilla’s Argentine centre-back Federico Fazio and remain keen on Huddersfield’s Jordan Rhodes.And the Express say Fulham have turned down a £1m bid for teenager Kerim Frei from Turkish club Galatasaray, who are now planning to make a £2m offer. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Willis’ 24 good for 10th straight win

first_imgDonald Willis lead all scorers with 24 points, Drew Gillette tacked on 20 more including four 3-pointers, Zac Claus had a handful of no-look passes (and 4 points) and the undefeated Fortuna Huskies expunged the Eureka Loggers 77-46 in the semifinal round of the Logger Classic, Friday night at Jay Willard Gymnasium.Friday’s win sends Fortuna (10-0) through to today’s championship round where the Huskies will face Dougherty Valley (6-1) at 2:30 p.m.The Huskies, now at full strength after the …last_img read more

Yes, We’re A Tech Site. Yes, We’re Suggesting You Spend Less Time Online

first_imgI’ve been thinking a lot lately about how much time I spend on the Internet, and worrying that it’s too much. When I joined ReadWrite I was surprised to discover that my new colleagues are struggling with the same issue. Just last week Jon Mitchell wrote two great pieces about this: Four Days Of Digital Detox: The Ultimate Tech Decelerator and Confessions of a Professional Internet Addict. Those came on the heels of a story by Brian Proffitt, Why I’m Joining The Movement To Stop Answering After-Hours Email.Those articles all argued (albeit not in so many words) that everyone needs to get off the Internet on a regular basis. They resonated so much with me and the rest of our staff that we’ve created a new series called “ReadWrite Pause” to explore issues around finding the right balance of online and offline life.Less Is More, More Or LessMaybe it seems weird that an Internet publication, especially one devoted to covering technology, would be urging people to spend less time online. But here we are. I’m guessing that a lot of our readers are like us, and have mixed feelings about how much time we’re all spending online. And maybe, if we all put our heads together, we can find a solution.In my case it’s all about my kids. They’re twins, age 7. I have this terrible fear that they’re going to remember me as some old guy who lived in their house when they were kids and was always staring at a smartphone. Or, worse, they’ll remember me as some guy who was always in another city, calling home once a day to say good night.This week I’m stuck in Las Vegas, living in a hotel, unable to get back to the East Coast thanks to the big storm. Tomorrow I head to Canada. By the time I get home next Tuesday night, I will have been home a total of three whole days in the past four weeks. On those three days I was mostly exhausted, and, yes, even on those days I spent time working at a computer and staring at a smartphone.I look at what I just wrote and I’m ashamed of myself. Honestly.And then I think: This is my life? Really? The issue goes beyond how we live at home. It’s even about how we work.Work Less. Get More Done.I was struck this week by this article on Forbes.com by a CEO who outlawed email at his company for a week and discovered that everybody actually got more work done. More important, they all felt more sane and less frantic as “a sense of calm descended.”The CEO, Shayne Hughes, argues that a lot of what email does is just get us all wound up, stressed out – spinning our hamster wheels but going nowhere. That certainly resonates for me. Some days (a lot of days, actually) it seems that all I do is go to meetings and then come out of meetings and hack through the email that has piled up while I’ve been in those meetings. Then it’s the end of the day and if I’ve managed to actually get anything done, it’s pretty much a miracle, or an accident.I know I’m not alone. I’ve even had people from Google – the most wired of wired environments – talk to me about the importance of going “off the grid,” and how this makes people more productive.This seems like common sense, but maybe not. It turns out there are people who believe that being online 24×7 is a fantastic way to live. Some Folks Seem To Like Staying ConnectedEarlier this week ReadWrite published a really fascinating interview with YouTube pundit Chris Pirillo who said he never disconnects, doesn’t want to. His one hobby involves playing with Legos, but he’s so busy with his online life that he doesn’t have time for Legos.I posted a link to the article on Facebook with a comment that the interview had made me profoundly depressed, and asking, rhetorically, whether there is anything sadder than someone who never disconnects from the Internet and is proud of that fact and thinks it’s great.Within minutes Marc Andreessen posted a comment saying, “And yet he’s a lot happier than you are.” Then David Berlind, a tech journalist, jumped in, saying my comment was “total bullshit” and that I should not be judging other people for what makes them happy. (Berlind might just still be sore because a few years ago I mocked him for predicting, in 2004, that Apple was “on the way out” – ha! – because of the looming juggernaut of… desktop Linux. I know, I know – just give those Linux guys more time and they’ll get it.) Anyway.Apparently there are people who never want to be cut off from the sacred umbilical cord that connects us to Mother Internet. (I’m guessing that if you made a Venn diagram of the “24×7 digital” people and the people who are still waiting for the Linux-on-the-desktop revolution, you’d have a big overlap.)And that’s fine, I guess. The fact that some people want nothing more than to be on the Internet, at all times, only makes the subject more interesting.I will tell you that earlier this summer my family spent a weekend at an Appalachian Mountain Club hut in New Hampshire, a place with no heat or electricity. We brought no iPads, no smartphones. No electronics at all. It poured rain the whole time. We stayed in the hut and played cards. We talked. It might have been the best time we have ever had as a family.And it made me wonder: If you live entirely on the Internet, are you even living? I’m fascinated by the Singularity movement, where the vision is that someday (not so long from now, if you believe Ray Kurzweil) the biological and the digital will become so thoroughly enmeshed that we won’t be able to tell one from the other.For a lot of us, a kind of virtual Singularity is already where we’re living. Maybe it’s just a personal decision. Maybe everyone has to find the balance that works for them. That’s the conversation we’re hoping to start with ReadWrite Pause. Where do you come down on this? Are you wired in at all times, and ecstatic about it? Or do you worry about how much time you spend online? What would be your ideal balance? And how can you achieve it? Tags:#iPad#iPhone#mobile technology#Pause#smartphones 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market dan lyons Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Private Members Motion will call for Freedom of Information Law

first_img TCI Country Leaders condemn vicious memes Related Items:2011 constitution, freedom of information, Pdm, private members motion, sharlene cartwright-robinson TCI Premier blasts Opposition side for “slop” information, sets it straight in HOA Only Doug and Ralph and Ruth can fit, that’s why Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppPprovdienciales, 16 Jul 2015 – When the House of Assembly convenes in August, the Opposition PDM will demand that the PNP Administration stop dancing around enacting a constitutional provision for a Freedom of Information law. PDM Leader, Sharlene Robinson said in a media statement yesterday “the Government has on several occasions presented bits of its proposed Legislative Agenda and has failed to include this important Legislation and to make good on its promise.” Hon Robinson and her party go on the record to say, “there is a serious need for the introduction of this Ordinance to allow for greater access to information which ought to be accessible in the furtherance of good governance.” Freedom of Information is defined in the Turks and Caicos 2011 Constitution, which in part outlines in Section 129 that an Ordinance shall provide for a right of access to information held by public authorities…” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for youlast_img read more