Huge deposit boost for SA platinum

first_img6 February 2013 A huge mineral deposit recently discovered in Limpopo province is even bigger than previously thought, and represents “enormous good news” for the future of platinum mining in South Africa, the head of Canadian company Ivanplats announced at the Investing in African Mining Indaba in Cape Town on Wednesday. Located on the northern limb of South Africa’s Bushveld Complex, the Platreef (or Flatreef) discovery is a massive deposit offering high-quality metals – “650-million tons of indicated and referred resources in a six square kilometre area”, Robert Friedland, the chairman of Ivanhoe Capital Corporation and the executive chairman of Ivanplats, told Indaba delegates.Clean, sustainable model promised In exploiting this reserve, the company promises a clean model, to be environmentally responsible, to have zero fatalities and to be sustainable. It would have a better model of employment and pay above-average wages, and it would have a “very broad-based black economic empowerment” component. It would deliver benefits beyond its mine, Friedland promised, including jobs and new skills. “Beneficiation will be our key driver. We can make catalytic convertors and jewellery right here.” He said that an intensive drilling programme in 2011 and 2012 had dramatically expanded and upgraded Platreef’s precious and base-metal mineral resources.Massive Bushveld deposit Bloomberg reported recently that Platreef’s indicated mineral resources now totalled 223-million tons at a grading of 4.1 grams per ton of platinum, palladium, gold and rhodium, at a cumulative, average true thickness of 24.3 metres. It also has nickel and copper. “Flatreef is distinguished from other Bushveld projects by its tremendous size, the remarkable thickness of the polymetallic mineralised reef and its potential for significant by-product credits of nickel and copper,” Friedland said on Wednesday. “The successful upgrading and expansion of the selective high-grade underground resources advance the definition of the initial mine plan in which we intend to incorporate safe, efficient, large-scale, mechanised mining methods.”Possible South African listing Friedland said Ivanplats would apply to the Department of Mineral Resources for a mining licence “that will have a large BBBEE [broad-based black economic empowerment] component.” The Canadian company, which has been exploring in Africa since 1994, listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange in October 2012. “We are now thinking of listing in South Africa as our secondary listing. Having been here, we think a listing in South Africa is more appropriate than London.” Friedland said it was critical to generate sustainable livelihoods around mines. “We must build mines where younger mine workers are more like skilled surgeons.” Also, the buyers of the end products – the car buyers in Japan, for example – would want to know the product was built with more than muscle power, and that the community around the mine was benefiting too. “We need to work here, find and forge a new economic model,” Friedland said, adding that it was “enormous good news” for South Africa that the discovery was in this country, which already produced 75% of the world’s primary platinum. Friedland was also very upbeat on the future of Africa, and South Africa in particular. “This is the beginning of incredible economic growth in Africa. Seven of the top 10 countries in terms of GDP [gross domestic product] growth are in Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa will have greater GDP growth,” he said. “So I am very optimistic about the future of this country.” He also predicted continuing demand for metals, saying there would be 37 megacities around the world by 2020. “All will need metals, particularly platinum to clean the air,” as well as copper and iron for high-speed trains. “We have come to a point of no return. Planet Earth is going urban. And an urban world is immensely consumptive of metals.” Source: Industrial Development Corporationlast_img read more

Dean’s Charity Steer Show pairs celebrities with 4-H members in the show ring

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseMany people understand the excitement and appeal as the judge strolls down the line looking over the cattle to make a decision that will change the life of a young, hopeful exhibitor with the slap of his hand.Cattle shows are, for some, a highlight of their year, through a large portion of the state’s population does not know a halter from a show stick. That will change for a few Ohio celebrities on July 30 with the inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show at 2:00 p.m. in the Voinovich Building at the Ohio State Fair. For the event, celebrity exhibitors — including some who never set foot in a show ring — will be paired with Ohio 4-H members to try their hand at showing a steer and vying for the judge’s eye.The idea got started in a meeting with Cathann Kress, Dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and Leslie Bumgarner who sits on the board of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio.“Leslie wanted to do something for a fundraiser. There are golf outings and galas, and other things but she thought it would be fun to do something different. I suggested to her that we do a steer show and, honestly, I think she thought I’d lost my mind,” Kress said. “When I was in Iowa, the governor had done a steer show for the Ronald McDonald Houses there. So it seemed like a natural fit here. I was interested in doing it because I thought it allowed a number of things I care a lot about to all come together — a passion for agriculture, getting to share agriculture with people, the focus on children both with the Ronald McDonald House and the involvement of the 4-H program, and the involvement of our community that I knew would come together and be supportive. So far it appears that will be the case. We’re all just going to have a lot of fun and we are delighted with the response we are getting.”The list of celebrity exhibitors includes former Ohio State University basketball standout, NBA player and announcer Clark Kellogg, the former first lady of Ohio State football Shelley Meyer, sportscaster for the Columbus Blue Jackets Bob McElligott, and Rick Malir, the CEO of City Barbeque.“We have some celebrity exhibitors who are well known to the agricultural community, like Adam Sharp with Ohio Farm Bureau. We’ll have other people who have never shown a steer in their life such as several news anchors and others. We will also have public officials. There will be some people who are very at home in the steer show ring — some people not so much,” Kress said. “Some exhibitors will be familiar with agriculture and for some people this will be their first experience learning about what we do in agriculture and maybe even their first time at the State Fair.”The cattle will be provided by 4-H members at the Ohio State Fair.“We asked the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association to help us identify 4-H families who would be willing to be a part of the celebrity exhibitors’ teams. The way this works is the 4-H families make their steer available to the celebrity and the 4-H member will also be a part of the team in the show ring with the exhibitor,” Kress said. “For example, my 4-H family is the family of Wyatt Osborn. He just turned 12 years old. His steer, Mr. Ranger, is the steer I am going to show. Wyatt will be with me in the ring.”Judges will select winners in three categories: best steer, showmanship and people’s choice.“After the show we will have a mock sale. No one will actually buy a steer but we are going to have an auction so people can see what an auction is like and all of the money is going to the Ronald McDonald House as donations,” Kress said. “Donors can donate online right now and give money in general or give money to one exhibitor or the other. We will also have kiosks set up at the Voinovich Center that day and you can make a donation through that too.”No matter which celebrity exhibitor comes out on top, participants are hoping the event will be a big win in many ways.“I have asked the celebrity exhibitors to invite 20 people to come with them to the State Fair, donate and cheer for the show. It is a great way for the audiences that maybe are not so familiar with the cattle industry to see what happens at the State Fair and understand a little more about agriculture in general. It is to have fun, raise money and raise awareness. And, maybe there will be some people in the audience who see this and think that 4-H is for their family,” Kress said. “If we do this right there will be a whole lot of winners.”Hopefully the biggest winner, though, is the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio (RMHC). The mission of RMHC is to create, find, and support programs that directly improve the health and well being of children and their families. Located across the street from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, the Ronald McDonald House serves as a home-away-from-home for families while a child is hospitalized. More than 4,500 families use the facility each year with 82,000 nights of lodging provided. The Columbus facility is the largest Ronald McDonald House in the world with 137 guest rooms and 120,000 square feet of kitchens, dining areas, play rooms, laundry facilities, a meditation room, exercise room, and informal gathering areas. The RMHC provides some comfort for families going through some truly challenging experiences while traveling for the medical care their children need. To find out more visit rmhc-centralohio.org.Volunteers are still needed to help make the Dean’s Charity Steer Show a success.“Contact our office or the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association if you want to work with us leading up to the show and the day of,” she said. “If you want to watch the show, come to the State Fair on July 30. That is also the same day as the legislative event and the Ohio Pork Rib-Off. We encourage people to make a day of it and go to all three events.”There is a practice session on campus leading up to the show where the celebrities can meet the 4-H families and get some showmanship pointers prior to the big day. Dean Kress has already been practicing, though, hoping for a chance to catch the attention of the judge on the day of the show.“I went to the Beef Expo earlier this year and showed with Wyatt at the Junior Show,” she said. “And that is where he told me I needed to work on my showmanship.”The Dean’s Charity Steer Show is coordinated by The Ohio State University, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Telhio Credit Union and the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association. Find out more and make a donation today at cfaes.osu.edu/deanscharitysteershow. Ohio Ag Net will be live streaming the Dean’s Charity Steer Show on July 30 at ocj.com.last_img read more

An Agent of Green Invention in Philly: Row House Demolition

first_imgHomes adjacent to demolished rowhouses in Philadelphia are left with more exposure to cold and heat. But three local professors collaborated on a solutionThere are certain efficiencies inherent in rowhouses, not the least of which is that their common sidewalls limit extreme-weather exposure largely to the front and back of each house.Noise sometimes leaks through the walls, but rowhouse living generally is fairly comfortable and energy efficient for city dwellers. Unless, of course, the rowhouse next to yours is razed.As a recent story in the Philadelphia Inquirer notes, that is one of the unintended consequences of an initiative launched several years ago by the administration of John F. Street, who served as mayor of Philadelphia from January 2000 to January 2008. Designed to further neighborhood revitalization, the program included tear-downs of derelict rowhouses but didn’t anticipate the tear-downs’ effect on the homes of adjacent neighbors, who were suddenly faced with increased sidewall exposure to heat and cold, and the added expenses that go with it.Maintaining Philly’s reputation for inventionThe occupants of many of the remaining rowhouses are “people who really can’t afford” to pay more to be comfortable, Fredda Lippes, an architect and also the city’s sustainability manager, told the paper. So Lippes and other city officials contracted Philadelphia University to find a solution, which, according to the Inquirer, now appears to be “just a few safety tests away” from being implemented.Three of Philadelphia University faculty members – engineering professor Chris Pastore; Robert Fleming, an associate professor in architecture; and Tom Twardowski, a chemical engineer – developed a product that consists of layers of insulating foam, high-density foam, fabric (to prevent penetration of sharp objects), and a latex-stucco finish. The material is durable and aesthetically appealing, its developers say.The plan is to produce this sheathing in 2×4 panels that can be affixed to an exterior wall with foaming adhesive. The university was awarded a patent for the product, called Exolation, last month.A potential bonus for the city, if the testing goes as hoped and officials can find a local company to make the sheathing, is that Exolation’s manufacture will create jobs for Philadelphia. So far so good. In two tests, the Inquirer points out, crews of three were able to cover an entire rowhouse wall in four hours or less.Another potential positive is that Exolation installations could help Philadelphia maintain its existing stock of rowhouses, which shape the character of much of the city. The town’s interest in preserving these homes is such that, as part of the city’s participation in the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Preservation Development Initiative, Philadelphia published a 52-page document on rowhouse preservation titled “Philadelphia Rowhouse Manual: A Practical Guide for Homeowners.”To say the least, city officials seem excited by Exolation’s prospects, and take particular pride in the fact that it is a product of local innovation.“In our city, [invention is] a tradition as old as Ben Franklin,” said Mark Alan Hughes, policy adviser to the current mayor, Michael Nutter. “Need fire insurance? Invent the fire insurance company. Need to make that company more profitable? Invent the lightning rod. Need a way to bring the benefits of insulation to rowhouses that have lost a neighbor? Invent Exolation.”last_img read more

Singleuse plastics to be banned inside Sealdah stn premises

first_imgKolkata: Single-use plastic materials will be banned inside the premises of Sealdah station from October 2.”Today (Saturday), we conducted different programmes spreading awareness about the harmful effects of plastics. I want to give a message that single-use plastics (disposable plastics) should be discontinued,” said P C Sharma, general manager of Eastern Railway (ER). A massive drive to stop use of plastics was organised by ER’s Sealdah division as part of the ‘Swachhta Hi Seva Pakhwada’ programme on Tuesday. A kiosk spreading awareness about the harmful effects of plastics was also installed inside the Sealdah station premises. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThe Ministry of Railways is observing ‘Swachhta Hi Seva Pakhwada’ across its entire network from September 15 to October 2, 2019 to commemorate the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, the father of the Nation. Detailed guidelines for the Pakhwada were formulated and circulated among each unit of Indian Railways. Sharma participated in the ‘Shramadaan’ for collection of plastic waste at Sealdah station. ER officials were also present on the occasion. ‘Shramadaan’ refers to a voluntary contribution involving physical effort. It is also a way to help and change the environment for the better. All railway vendors were instructed to avoid use of plastic carry-bags. Railway employees were also advised to ‘reduce, reuse and refuse’ plastic products and to use inexpensive reusable bags to reduce plastic footprint. After October 2, people will be fined if found using single-use plastics inside the station premises.last_img read more