Cape Dorset unveils neverbeforeseen exhibit at new cultural CentreCape Dorset unveils neverbeforeseen exhibit at new cultural Centre

first_imgKent DriscollAPTN NewsCape Dorset Nunavut has been producing world-class Inuit art for nearly 60 years and the community finally has a new centre to showcase those works.Named after one of the most notable producers of Inuit art, the Kenojuak Ashevak Cultural Centre opened just a few months ago.Kenojuak Ashevak’s enchanted owl piece was made into a Canadian postage stamp, it also hangs prominently in the place named after her.Cultural Centre manager Louisa Parr remembers Ashevak when she was younger and says “she was extraordinary, she was very kind, she never had anything bad to say about anybody, she was kinda old fashioned, but also very famous.”kdriscoll@aptn.ca@KentDriscolllast_img read more

An uneasy peace Deal reached to open Unistoten gate to CGLAn uneasy peace Deal reached to open Unistoten gate to CGL

first_imgKathleen MartensAPTN NewsAnger greeted news Wednesday that hereditary Wet’suwet’en chiefs brokered a peaceful end to a potentially violent pipeline standoff in northern B.C.Leader Freda Huson stormed out of a closed-door meeting at the Unist’ot’en camp south of Houston, B.C., and slammed the door.She just learned chiefs promised the RCMP she and her partner Warner Naziel would abide by rules of an interim court injunction in exchange for calling off a police raid.Chiefs wanted to prevent a repeat of Monday when heavily RCMP officers stormed a checkpoint on sister clan Gidimt’en territory and arrested 14 people.The homemade barricades blocking pipeline company Coastal GasLink, a subsidiary of Trans-Canada, from crossing the Morice River bridge were next before chiefs stepped in.“CGL will receive soft access,” Chief Na’Moks told reporters, who were allowed into the room to hear details of the agreement after about two hours.“I don’t have any respect for them,” Nam’oks added of the Calgary-based company.“If I seem upset, you better believe we are.”(Trucks parked on the road leading to the Unist’ot’en healing centre to block access. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)In a tentative agreement worked out between the RCMP and Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs Wednesday evening, the nation made three demands to Brenda Butterworth-Carr, deputy commissioner of the RCMP in B.C. who is a member of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Han Nation, Yukon.In part, that the RCMP immediately remove the exclusion area to allow access for media and others, confirm that RCMP officers will not interfere with any Wet’suwet’en members accessing their territory for trapping or other traditional practices, confirm that officers will not enter the healing centre and will engage with the Wet’suwet’en Nation to work on a protocol for access to the healing centre that will protect members from pro-pipeline protestors and Coastal GasLink employees.The meeting then heard the RCMP’s reply.“I commit to you that the RCMP will remain respectful of the healing centre,” said the response from the RCMP. “Our officers will not enter the healing centre unless invited and we will work with you to ensure that others are respectful of your centre.“Further, the RCMP will not interfere with your members access to the territory for the purposes of trapping and or traditional practices. I will also restate our commitment to the respect the right of peaceful, lawful and safe protest.”The tentative agreement would have the Unist’oten camp remove the barrier and allow workers from Coastal GasLink through the site by 2 p.m. on Thursday. Talks Thursday may go past that time.Huson didn’t return to the meeting in the centre’s dining room that stretched into the late afternoon.(The healing centre at the Unist’ot’en camp. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)The windows in the room were covered with sheets and blankets to prevent police from being able to see or shoot inside, said Brenda Michell, a Wet’suwet’en woman staying at the camp and niece of Unistot’en hereditary Chief Knedabeas.She said the peace agreement was a surprise and didn’t know how to react, except to say opening the gate to contract workers worried her.She asked the chiefs, who spent Tuesday night and Wednesday morning negotiating with RCMP, to amend the agreement at a meeting scheduled with police Thursday, to keep the gate locked and opened only when CGL workers arrived.“The gate is protecting us from the outside,” she said. “I can sleep at night knowing it’s there.”Michell and others at the camp looked exhausted.They were girding for a police raid when Knedabeas arrived instead with three members of an RCMP liaison team and news reporters, including a two-person team from APTN News.It was the second surprise in as many nights.Michell said they were stunned Tuesday when people who “escaped” the Gidimt’en raid pounded on the door.“We were all in shock when they managed to come back here,” she said, not revealing how many there were.“We were relieved and happy to see them.”(A convoy on the Morice River road includes hereditary chiefs, media and RCMP. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)Reporters were told escapees were in bad shape mentally but there were trained people at the healing centre to help them.Na’Moks said avoiding any further trauma to more people is why chiefs made the deal.“We want media here to witness our agreement with the RCMP,” he said.But the camp refused to divulge its wifi password, preventing most media outlets, including APTN from reporting what was happening until returning to Houston later.It was another of the hurdles media faced in covering the story that generated headlines around the world.On Monday, RCMP barred reporters from gaining access to the Gidimt’en checkpoint by erecting a roadblock about 20 kilometres away. Media who were already behind the lines were allowed to stay.The roadblock opened briefly Wednesday to allow the chiefs’ convoy through to camp, although Mounties stopped each vehicle to record the names of people inside and their licence numbers.The roadblock was at a site without cellular phone service, so reporters couldn’t relay information to their newsrooms or post on social media.Supporters of the roadblock and camp built a fire and shelter outside the roadblock that quickly became a meeting place.That’s where chiefs initially planned to announce the peace agreement Wednesday morning before deciding to make the hour-long drive to the healing centre that saw one media outlet end up in the ditch and miss the news conference.When the convoy reached Gidimt’en checkpoint it was reporters’ first opportunity to see the aftermath of Monday’s raid.There were felled trees pushed off the road – scattered branches, a jacket and backpacks left behind, and the red plywood gate some protesters reportedly tied themselves to was thrown in the ditch.(The Gidimt’en sign at the checkpoint on January 9. Photo: Simon Charland/APTN)The Gidimt’en signs were still up and shelters remained standing, which followed the judge’s instructions in the interim injunction granted Dec. 14, 2018.A canvas cook tent that caught fire was still there, showing char marks on one wall.Gidimt’en supporters said everyone arrested Tuesday was released from custody by Wednesday night.Upon reaching the camp, Na’Moks appeared overcome with emotion as he stopped in the snow to survey the narrow bridge over the Morice River.A large, vertical sign declaring ‘Unist’ot’en’ in black and white caught his attention, as did three vehicles, including a dump truck, parked on the bridge to stop police.Knedabeas was visibly angry and quizzed people operating the gate.“Why are these here?” he said of the vehicles.“That wasn’t the plan.”kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more

GOP health bill offers provisions aimed at helping 2 statesGOP health bill offers provisions aimed at helping 2 states

first_imgWASHINGTON – Provisions shoehorned into the Republican health care bill dangle extra money for Alaska and Wisconsin, home states of one GOP senator whose vote party leaders desperately need and another who co-sponsored the legislation, according to analysts who’ve studied the legislation.The 140-page measure, which top Republicans hope to push through the Senate next week, is stuffed with language making some states winners and others losers. Aides say the legislation is still changing as leaders hunt the 50 GOP “yes” votes they’ll need to turn this summer’s jarring Senate rejection of the party’s crusade to erase President Barack Obama’s law into an eleventh-hour triumph.Alaska is home to GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who’s among a handful of Republicans who’ve not said how they’ll vote. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is one of the bill’s co-sponsors and his support is not in question, but the episode suggests the value of helping craft of legislation.The bill was chiefly written by GOP Sens. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham. It would end Obama’s Medicaid expansion and subsidies for people buying private insurance and combine the money into new block grants for states.With all Democrats opposed, Republicans controlling the Senate 52-48 can lose only two votes if they are to succeed, leaving the bill’s fate uncertain. Generally, it would shift money from states that expanded their Medicaid programs for the poor under Obama’s statute, which tend to be run by Democrats, to the largely Republican-run states that shunned that expansion.The measure would shield Alaska from some cuts it imposes on Medicaid, according to analysts, including from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation, by limiting spending to a maximum amount per beneficiary starting in 2020. The federal-state program for low earners has always automatically provided whatever money is needed for eligible recipients. Montana would also qualify for the exemption.It would also increase federal Medicaid funds for states with high American Indian populations, including Alaska, according to health care consultant April Grady.Analysts offered no figures about how much money the provisions would mean for Alaska.The provisions hardly ensure support from Murkowski, who’s said she’s studying how the measure would affect her state. The administration was pushing for her support, with Vice-President Mike Pence calling into an Anchorage talk-radio show Thursday and urging listeners to contact Murkowski and ask her to “stand with President Trump” and support the bill.According to studies released this week by Kaiser and the consulting firm Avalere Health, Alaska is among many states that would lose money overall under the bill. Alaska has unusually high health care costs because of the remoteness of many communities.The provisions do not mention Alaska or Wisconsin by name.But the bill allows a state that turned down extra federal funds to expand Medicaid under Obama’s statute to count the rejected money in determining how large its block grant will be, analysts say.Grady, Avalere analyst Chris Sloan and others said they were unaware of states other than Wisconsin that would benefit from the provision. This language could mean “potentially hundreds of millions” of extra dollars for Wisconsin, said Grady.In a written statement provided by aides, Johnson said funding formulas to correct “the grossly unfair” distribution of money under Obama’s law needed to be changed “to reflect the unique circumstances of many states, including recognizing the innovative reforms of Wisconsin.”Wisconsin is among 19 states that declined to fully expand Medicaid under Obama’s law, which also provided generous federal reimbursements. Under Gov. Scott Walker, a GOP 2016 presidential contender, Wisconsin just partially expanded Medicaid and agreed to accept smaller federal subsidies.The provision in the health care bill applies to states that expanded Medicaid only up to 100 per cent of the federal poverty level and had that expansion in effect this past Sept. 1.Since the bill’s details emerged, health industry and other groups have been lining up against it.The National Association of Medicaid Directors, representing state officials who administer Medicaid, said it is concerned the measure would have damaging consequences on state budgets. Also announcing opposition recently was America’s Health Insurance Plans, a huge health insurers’ trade group, the American Hospital Association and the American Medical Association.___Associated Press writer Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar contributed.last_img read more

Calgary has made quantum leaps in tech but adaptation must continue CEDCalgary has made quantum leaps in tech but adaptation must continue CED

first_imgWith the prospect of the energy sector not having the same economic impact as in decades past for Alberta, the head of Calgary Economic Development says the city has job creators have to continue to adapt to a changing fiscal landscape.“We have a little adapting to do,” Mary Moran said after a joint presentation to a Calgary audience with the Conference Board of Canada and ATB Financial.Moran said that mostly has to do with technological advancements we have to get more comfortable dealing with uncertainty.“Advancements that are in our face, not happening down the road, they’re happening today,” she said. “GDP growth and job growth will come from a different place and so we have to make sure that we’re set up.”But Moran said there’s good news in recent history.“Compared to a year ago, I think we’ve made quantum leaps,” she said, pointing to some of the economic success she outlined in her presentation, such as CED helping support around 90 businesses in the last two years, creating approximately 5,000 jobs.Recent successes have included Amazon announcing it’ll be building a fulfillment centre in Balzac that will create 750 jobs, as well as companies like RocketSpace, a California-based tech firm setting up a local branch.But she also said while there’s plenty of private wealth in the city, conditions have to be ripe for private investment and attracting capital, which the Conference Board of Canada agrees with.The board’s senior fellow Glen Hodgson said while Calgary’s economy will grow by 4.6 per cent this year and 2.1 next year, he’s keeping a close eye on if there will be a certain kind of balance.“This year it’s way too much the consumer [spending], not enough private investment, next year I’m looking for more,” he said.As for the big fish of Amazon picking Calgary as its second headquarters, Moran denies the notion Calgary doesn’t have much of a chance.“I hear it all,” she said. “We do have a shot.“If it comes down to cost and it comes down to having the right talent, then we have a really, really chance.”last_img read more

Disney reverses ban on LA Times critics from screeningsDisney reverses ban on LA Times critics from screenings

first_imgLOS ANGELES, Calif. – The Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday lifted its ban of Los Angeles Times reporters and critics from its press screenings after a widespread backlash prompted several media outlets to announce their own boycotts of Disney movies.In a statement Tuesday, Disney said it was restoring access to the newspaper after “productive discussions with the newly installed leadership” at the Los Angeles Times. Disney had barred the Times from its screenings after the paper published a two-part investigative series on the company’s business dealings in Anaheim, California, where Disneyland is.Disney’s punitive measures against the Times led to many outlets refusing advance coverage of the studio’s films, including The New York Times, the Boston Globe and The A.V. Club. Four prominent film critics groups announced Tuesday that they would bar Disney films from receiving awards considerationThe ban’s withdraw Tuesday ended an unusual clash between Hollywood’s arguably most powerful studio and the media outlets that regularly write about its movies.The Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the New York Film Critics Circle, the Boston Society of Film Critics and the National Society of Film Critics all said that wouldn’t consider Disney films for their year-end awards. The critics groups noted that it was “admittedly extraordinary” to “take any action that might penalize film artists for decisions beyond their control.”“But Disney brought forth this action when it chose to punish The Times’ journalists rather than express its disagreement with a business story via ongoing public discussion,” the statement continued. “Disney’s response should gravely concern all who believe in the importance of a free press, artists included.”The New York Times said in a statement Tuesday that it wouldn’t attend preview screenings of Disney films while the LA Times can’t, saying Disney’s move is a “dangerous precedent and not at all in the public interest.”Disney on Friday said that the Times series in September detailing what it characterized as a complicated and increasingly tense relationship between Anaheim and the company showed “a complete disregard for basic journalistic standards.” It added that the Times published a “biased and inaccurate series, wholly driven by a political agenda.”Daniel Miller, the Times reporter who wrote the series, tweeted that “Disney never asked for a correction.” The newspaper declined further comment.With the ban concluded, critics said they would return to business as usual. Disney’s upcoming films are the Pixar release “Coco” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.”“See you guys at the Coco screening,” wrote New York Times critic A.O. Scott.___Associated Press Writers Patrick Mairs and Tali Arbel contributed to this report.last_img read more

Maple Leaf Foods buying poultry plants in Ontario and Quebec from CericolaMaple Leaf Foods buying poultry plants in Ontario and Quebec from Cericola

first_imgMISSISSAUGA, Ont. – Maple Leaf Foods Inc. has signed an agreement to buy two poultry plants and associated supply from Cericola Farms, a privately held company.The plants are in Bradford, Ont., and Drummondville, Que., and together process a total of about 32 million kilograms of chicken per year.Financial terms of the deal were not immediately available.Cericola specializes in air-chilled processing of antibiotic free and animal by-product free and organic poultry products.Maple Leaf said it has also signed a deal for 100 per cent of the processed chicken from Cericola’s primary plant in Schomberg, Ont., and an option to acquire the plant and associated supply in three years.The deal is expected to close in August, subject to normal closing requirements including Competition Bureau review.Companies in this story: (TSX:MFI)last_img read more

Objections blunt momentum for foreign lobbying law overhaulObjections blunt momentum for foreign lobbying law overhaul

first_imgWASHINGTON – A push to give the Justice Department more enforcement authority over the lucrative and at times shadowy world of foreign lobbying is stalled amid opposition from pro-business groups, nonprofits and privacy advocates.Organizations that range from the influential U.S. Chamber of Commerce to the National Association of Criminal Defence Lawyers have raised objections to legislation that would sharpen the teeth of the Foreign Agents Registration Act. The law, enacted 80 years ago to expose Nazi propaganda, requires people to disclose when they lobby in the U.S. on behalf of foreign governments or political entities.While there’s bipartisan support for cracking down on unregistered foreign agents, several of the changes proposed in congressional bills could backfire by sweeping in a host of unintended targets, according to critics. That pushback has effectively kept the legislation from advancing as lobbying groups press for revisions.One of the most contentious provisions would eliminate a popular loophole that permits lobbyists representing foreign commercial interests to be exempt from the law, known as FARA. That shift, one business group has warned, could extend the rigorous disclosure requirements to U.S. subsidiaries of global companies, stigmatizing them as foreign agents even though they employ thousands of Americans.Congressional interest in fortifying the law comes in the aftermath of Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election and a special counsel investigation that’s drawn greater attention to the inner workings of international influence peddling.Most recently, Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, admitted in a plea deal that he’d failed to register as a foreign agent when he directed a lobbying operation for Ukrainian interests. Prosecutors said he concealed millions of dollars in income for the work from the IRS.Earlier this year, federal prosecutors unveiled an indictment against a Russian troll farm accused of interfering in the 2016 election through bogus Facebook posts that revealed how foreign parties can weaponize social media to influence public opinion.Yet criminal cases under FARA have been rare, with fewer than a dozen since 1966 as the Justice Department generally emphasized voluntary compliance over prosecution. Lawmakers supporting the bills say a 2016 inspector general’s report found that the department lacked the tools it needed to properly enforce FARA. A violation of the law is punishable by a fine or up to five years in prison.But the defence lawyers association and the Center for Democracy and Technology, a civil-liberties group, have declared that Fourth Amendment privacy protections would be undermined by a section of the bill that would expand the Justice Department’s power to investigate possible violations of the law.And an alliance of nongovernmental organizations called InterAction has urged lawmakers to repair vague and outdated provisions in the current law before passing a new one that strengthens the government’s hand. These groups fear that the law, if not repaired, could leave nonprofits open “to possible politicized enforcement actions and attack,” according to an open letter more than 40 members and partners of InterAction wrote earlier this year.The House version of the bill, sponsored by Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., seemed to be on the fast track to passage in the GOP-led House after a committee approved it in January by a comfortable margin. Yet eight months later, it hasn’t moved any further.Johnson described the objections as “overblown” and said he’s hopeful the full House will vote on his bill before the end of the year. The House is in recess and won’t return until after the Nov. 6 elections.“People in Washington are resistant to change,” Johnson said. “The longer we wait to enact these reforms the more critical they become.”An identical Senate bill, by Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, is bottled up in the Foreign Relations Committee. Grassley charged last year that there has been “rampant disregard” of the law by foreign agents and “lacklustre enforcement by federal authorities.”President Donald Trump invoked the law in a Sept. 13 tweet that attacked former Secretary of State John Kerry for meeting with Iran’s foreign minister, who was his main interlocutor during the Iran nuclear deal negotiations. Trump called the meetings illegal and questioned whether Kerry, now a private citizen, had registered as a foreign agent.But Trump’s broadside appeared to be off base. Meetings between a private U.S. citizen and foreign official are not against the law and not necessarily inappropriate or a violation of federal regulations. Further, FARA provisions don’t extend to activities conducted entirely overseas.“What we are currently seeing is a lot of confusion over the vagueness of FARA and concern that the breadth of the law can lead to its politicized use,” said Nick Robinson, legal adviser at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law.Lobbyists that register under FARA must report specific meetings, phone calls and other details of contacts with members of Congress or federal officials to the Justice Department, which then posts the material online .The loophole targeted for elimination permits lobbyists representing foreign commercial interests to get an exemption provided that they register under the less-demanding Lobbying Disclosure Act. The quarterly reports filed with the House and Senate under the 1995 Lobbying Disclosure Act also are made public but require much less information.U.S.-based subsidiaries of international companies say the change may lead officials to avoid meeting with companies bound by FARA, putting them at a disadvantage with their domestic competitors.The legislation is supposed to target foreign governments or political parties but may “catch these companies in the crosshairs,” said Nancy McLernon, president of the Organization for International Investment, a lobbying group that represents the U.S. operations of global businesses including BP America, Honda North America, Nestle USA and Samsung.“No one wants to be labeled a foreign agent,” she said. “It sounds like a spy for a foreign government.”The legislation also would allow the Justice Department to demand that individuals and businesses turn over material relevant to federal investigations into alleged violations of FARA. Backers of the bill say the department’s FARA registration unit has long sought the use of administrative subpoenas to better enforce the law. The bill, they added, includes safeguards to ensure this authority isn’t abused.But the National Association of Criminal Defence Lawyers, in a sharply worded letter to the leaders of the House Judiciary Committee, said the investigative procedures proposed in the bill amount to an “expansion of unchecked law-enforcement authority.” The department would be able “to compel the production of documents and force the testimony of the targets of criminal investigations, without any prior showing of probable cause or court approval,” the association’s letter said.The letter was written in January. Spokesman Ivan Dominguez said the association’s position has not changed.___Contact Richard Lardner on Twitter at http://twitter.com/rplardnerlast_img read more

TSX resumes last weeks sell off despite strong gains from cannabis sectorTSX resumes last weeks sell off despite strong gains from cannabis sector

first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s main stock index resumed last week’s selloff by closing down slightly on Monday despite strong gains by the cannabis-heavy health sector just days before the drug’s legalization.The markets are just trying to find a little bit of footing at the start of the corporate earnings season after last week’s spike in volatility, said Craig Fehr, Canadian markets strategist for Edward Jones.North American markets lost ground during the day after ending Friday on the upswing following a few days of heavy losses.“I think we’re going to get this kind of tennis match between the ongoing anxiety of the selloff and probably the positive news of corporate earnings and that probably can keep the markets bouncing around,” he said in an interview from San Francisco.“I expect volatility to continue this week, probably not to the degrees we saw last week but I think the balance between those two forces at the moment are probably going to keep the markets a little bit on edge this week.”The S&P/TSX composite index closed down slightly, losing 4.82 points to 15,409.47, after dipping to a low of 15,398.47 on 246.8 million shares traded.The health care sector gained 6.7 per cent, followed by gold. Information technology, energy and financial sectors were the biggest losers on the day.Energy was down on some geopolitical concerns related to the suspected death of a Washington Post columnist after he had entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Turkey.Most cannabis stocks enjoyed solid gains as the enthusiasm that has driven the sector higher continued.Fehr expects the exuberance will continue past Wednesday’s legalization of recreational cannabis use.“I don’t think that that has to necessarily come an end just because of legalization but I think the enthusiasm will wane once the kind of the shimmer wears off this newness to the growth story here.”He said the momentum enjoyed by cannabis shares is very similar to cryptocurrencies earlier this year.“That can only last for so long,” Fehr added. “At some point this sector, these companies are going to have to rely on growth, they’re going to have to rely on revenues and profits as a driver of their stock prices.”In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 89.44 points to 25,250.55. The S&P 500 index shed 16.34 points to 2,750.79, while the Nasdaq composite was off 66.15 points to 7,430.74.Fehr warned investors not to look at the market volatility as the beginning of the end of the bull run because it’s not driven by news about a global or North American downturn.“Instead I look at it much more as a healthy, normal type of correction that’s just based off of some concerns about some trends that we’ve known about for some time.”The Canadian dollar traded at an average of 76.96 US compared with an average of 76.7 cents US on Friday.The November crude contract was up 44 cents at US$71.78 per barrel and the November natural gas contract was up 8.1 cents at US$3.24 per mmBTU.The December gold contract was up US$8.30 at US$1,230.30 an ounce and the December copper contract was down 1.2 cents at US$2.79 a pound.last_img read more

Steelworkers accuse Alcoa of bargaining in bad faith during Quebec negotiationsSteelworkers accuse Alcoa of bargaining in bad faith during Quebec negotiations

first_imgTROIS-RIVIERES, Que. — With a negotiation deadline looming, the United Steelworkers union has filed a complaint with Quebec’s Administrative Labour Tribunal alleging bad faith bargaining by Alcoa Corp. at its aluminum smelter near Trois-Rivieres, where unionized workers have been locked out since January.Local union president Clement Masse says Alcoa is “not taking the negotiation process seriously,” claiming the company has reneged on previous commitments at the bargaining table.Alcoa is calling the union complaint “false and unfounded,” and says the mine’s management has been negotiating in good faith.In November, the Quebec government appointed a special mediation council, chaired by former premier Lucien Bouchard, with a settlement deadline set for Friday.Alcoa announced Wednesday it would cut output in half at its ABI smelter in Becancour, Que., due to the impact of an ongoing lockout.The Pittsburgh-based company curtailed two of the facility’s three pot lines in January after unionized workers rejected a company contract proposal.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

SD 60 facing teacher shortage using AHCOTE strategy to attract teachersSD 60 facing teacher shortage using AHCOTE strategy to attract teachers

first_imgSD 60 and 59 are currently facing a teacher crunch after the decision by the Supreme Court of Canada that introduced hundreds of new jobs across the province, resulting in the districts competing with other regions of the province in regards to teacher prospects.“How do we enhance growing the strategy of growing teachers locally?” added Sloan. “AHCOTE is a great strategy and is a high yield strategy in that regard because it takes in people who are already familiar with the area that want to teach here. It’s the best way to try to produce more teachers in the immediate future to help deal with the shortages.”Even though the school year is nearly 75 percent complete, the district still has teacher vacancies, Sloan stated he is very confident with the support from everyone involved that more people will be drawn to northeast B.C. to help deal with the shortage. In the meantime, the district is signing off on a lot of letters of permission for people who have the necessary college degrees in the required fields, as a temporarily fill. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – School District 60 is teaming up with other schools and their representatives in northeastern B.C., in order to come up with better ways of recruiting more teachers to the area.The Alaska Highway Consortium on Teacher Education is comprised of the Northern Lights College along with area School Districts including 59 and 60. Its training program is run out of NLC in association with Simon Fraser University.“The Consortium has always had representatives from Fort Nelson, Dawson Creek and Fort St. John,” said Superintendent Dave Sloan. “In the past few years the cohorts have gotten smaller and there are fewer teacher candidates. Cohorts have gone to 18 months of intake every other year instead of every year as both districts north and south of the river are facing a teacher shortage.”last_img read more

Province launching prototype childcare spaces for only 10 a dayProvince launching prototype childcare spaces for only 10 a day

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The Province of B.C. has launched applications for prototype daycares that will charge only $10 a day.The Ministry of Children and Family Development is now accepting applications from licensed child care providers who want their facilities to become prototype sites, which will model child care at a cost of $200-a-month per child, and report on the results. Information learned from these prototype sites will inform changes and the expansion of universal child care over the next 10 years.The new prototype sites, which will run from Sept. 1, 2018, to March 31, 2019, will convert approximately 1,800 licensed child care spaces at existing facilities around the province into low-cost spaces for families. Fees at approved facilities will be capped at $200 a month, per child. For eligible families with an annual pre-tax income of less than $45,000, childcare will be free at these facilities through the new Affordable Child Care Benefit, which will officially roll out in September 2018. Families with a pre-tax income under $111,000 will pay less than $10 a day.Providers interested in this opportunity can learn more by participating in informational webinars being held at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 20, Wednesday, June 27, and Wednesday, July 4, 2018. To join one of the webinars, please visit: http://video.web.gov.bc.ca/mcfd/liveIn February, the Province signed a $153-million Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) partnership agreement with the Government of Canada. As part of this agreement, the federal government is investing $60 million over the next two years to support these prototype sites.last_img read more

Grande Prairie RCMP search for missing two yearoldGrande Prairie RCMP search for missing two yearold

first_imgUPDATE as of 11:30 p.m. July 7 – RCMP continue to assist in the search for a two year old boy who went missing near the Wapiti River at the Canfor Bridge during the evening of July 6, 2018. The search continued throughout the day on July 7, 2018 and included boats, all-terrain vehicles and a helicopter in addition to people searching on foot. The search was concluded for the night at approximately 11:00 PM and will resume at 07:00 AM on July 8, 2018. RCMP and a number of search and rescue members will remain on scene for the duration of the night.   Police are asking the general public to stay away from the area to allow emergency services to focus on the search.UPDATE as of 7:00 a.m. July 7 – Search crews continue to search the are near the Canfor Bridge on the Wapiti River.  The search was suspended at 11 p.m. Friday, but search and rescue crews remained on scene overnight until the search resumed this morning.  The RCMP say all available resources have been deployed to help with the search.Police are asking the general public to stay away from the area to allow emergency services to focus on the search.ORIGINAL STORY:GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The RCMP and STARS Air Ambulance along with the Grande Prairie Technical Search and Rescue are searching in the MD of Greenview for a missing two year old child.The two year-old boy was with his family at the Wapiti River, near the Canfor Bridge, when he disappeared.https://twitter.com/williamvavrek/status/1015407726690615296The RCMP are asking for the general public to stay away from the area while emergency crews focus on the search.https://twitter.com/STARSambulance/status/1015417841347153920When more information is released, we will post further updates.last_img read more

Power outages all over the BC PeacePower outages all over the BC Peace

first_imgFor details on the other outages in the Peace, visit www.bchydro.com/outages. UPDATE:  For the latest information about power outages in the B.C. Peace, visit www.bchydro.com/outagesFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Over 800 customers are without power around the BC Peace region due to the wind storm in the area.The largest outage is between Fort St. John and Dawson Creek along the Alaska Highway. Over 400 customers are without power. That outage is under investigation. There is no estimate on when power will be restored.last_img read more

Gun shots in Taylor leads to police pursuitGun shots in Taylor leads to police pursuit

first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – After a report of gunshots in Taylor, the Fort St. John RCMP were able to apprehend three suspects.On February 17, 2019, at 2:48 AM, the Fort St John RCMP Received a call from a Taylor resident who had been awakened by what they believed to be gunshots in the 9800 block of North Spruce Street in Taylor.Several officers were immediately deployed to the scene. On route, officers noted a lone vehicle heading north on Highway 97 from Taylor. When one of the officers went to conduct a traffic stop of the Dodge van, several items were observed being thrown from the van, one of which was believed to be a bullet-resistant vest.Police pursued the vehicle to Fort St John where it pulled into a local hotel parking lot and the three occupants attempted to flee from police on foot, but they were all taken into custody.The RCMP allege items were thrown from the vehicle during the pursuit.  The items were all recovered and identified as a bullet resistant vest, a shotgun and a 9mm pistol.I am very proud of the systematic response by our officers to this type of high risk call. They were able to contain the threat to the public while safely apprehending the alleged suspects, says Sergeant Dave Tyreman, acting Operations Officer.A 32-year-old Taylor woman, a 29-year-old Fort St John Man, and a 34-year-old Victoria man are being held in custody pending a Provincial Court appearance to answer to numerous firearm and other related offences.last_img read more

TMC heavyweights go on campaign trail across stateTMC heavyweights go on campaign trail across state

first_imgKolkata: Trinamool Congress candidates across the state hit the campaign trail on Sunday, with party leaders Subrata Mukherjee, Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar, Mala Roy, Mamata Bala Thakur and Moon Moon Sen among others seen interacting with voters of their respective constituencies.Mala Roy, who is contesting from the Kolkata South seat, started her campaign near the Tollygunge railway station, accompanied by state Public Works Department (PWD) minister and Tollygunge MLA Aroop Biswas. Roy braved the scorching summer heat and walked across ward 81 of Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC), interacting with the people. She gave a patient hearing to problems in her constituency, including those of the slum dwellers and assured them that she would address the issues, if she is elected. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja”Our party supremo has given the call for the party to win all 42 Lok Sabha seats in Bengal. We are her soldiers and will try our best to fulfill her dream,” Biswas said. Meanwhile, senior TMC leader Sobhandeb Chattopadhyay was found making wall graffiti in favour of Roy and also painting the symbol of the party on a wall. TMC candidate from Bankura and senior party leader Subrata Roy walked and also boarded a toto during his campaign. “I have an emotional attachment with the people of Bankura and my work particularly for the Public Health & Engineering department, has brought about a major boost to water supply in this district. I will urge those who have benefitted from my work to vote for me,” Mukherjee said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayMukherjee had lost ten years ago when he had contested in Bankura on a Congress ticket. Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar, TMC candidate from the Barasat seat, attended a programme of the Matua community at Akarampur in Habra on Sunday. She also danced to the tunes of a devotional song of the community. The votes from the Matua community, which accounts for around 10 percent of the total votes, are going to be a factor in the Barasat seat. Trinamool Congress candidate from Bongaon Mamata Bala Thakur offered her prayers at Jaleshwar Temple in Gaighata and also went to a nearby mosque to seek blessings from the head of the mosque. She then walked in and around the Jaleshwar area, seeking votes. Trinamool Congress candidate from Asansol Moon Moon Sen campaigned at Amritnagar in Ranigunj. Addressing a public gathering, she said that some Opposition parties may come and offer money, seeking votes. “If they offer money, you take it but you should vote for Didi (Mamata Banerjee),” she maintained.last_img read more