SANTA ANITA’S 23-DAY AUTUMN MEET SET TO OPEN ON FRIDAY, WITH FIRST POST TIME AT 1 P.M.; TRACK TO HOST RECORD 10TH BREEDERS’ CUP WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS NOV. 1 & 2

first_imgSANTA ANITA’S 23-DAY AUTUMN MEET SET TO OPEN ON FRIDAY, WITH FIRST POST TIME AT 1 P.M.; TRACK TO HOST RECORD 10TH BREEDERS’ CUP WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS NOV. 1 & 2 ARCADIA, Calif. (Sept. 23, 2019)–With entries set to be taken on Tuesday, Santa Anita Park’s 23-day Autumn Meet will open on Friday, Sept. 27, with first post time at 1 p.m.  The highlight of the meeting, which concludes Sunday, Nov. 3, will be a record 10th Breeders’ Cup World Championships on Nov. 1 & 2.  Tickets for the 2019 Breeders’ Cup can now be purchased through the Breeders’ Cup Ticket Office at (877) 849-4287, or by visiting breederscup.com/tickets.Located just east of Pasadena in Arcadia, Santa Anita first opened on Dec. 25, 1934 and as such, is an iconic figure on the Southern California sports landscape, preceding all other major sports franchises in Los Angeles.     Aside from the two-day Breeders’ Cup, first post time on weekdays will be at 1 p.m. and on weekends, at 12:30 p.m.  Admission gates open at 11 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. respectively.SANTA ANITA AUTUMN MEET FACT SHEET–FREE ADMISSION AND PARKING ON ALL WEEKDAYS, EXCLUDING NOV. 1 & 2.–WEEKEND GENERAL ADMISSION:  $5–WEEKEND CLUBHOUSE ADMISSION:  $10–MEZZANINE BOX SEATS:  $10 PER SEAT.–RACING PROGRAM:  $3–WEEKEND GENERAL PARKING:  $4–VALET PARKING:  $10–TWO DOLLAR BEERS AND SIX DOLLAR SPECIALTY COCKTAILS ARE OFFERED EACH FRIDAY TO THOSE 21 AND OVER.–ASIDE FROM WEEK ONE, SANTA ANITA’S AUTUMN MEET WILL OPERATE ON A FOUR-DAY WEEK, THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY.–FANS ARE ENCOURAGED to sign up for XB Rewards to get Admissions discounts and special offers.  Visit the XB Rewards Center located on the Grandstand main floor.–SANTA ANITA IS OFFERING A WIDE RANGE OF EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS THIS SEASON.  For additional information or to purchase tickets online, please visit santaanita.com/events–FRONTRUNNER RESTAURANT–Glass enclosed with spectacular views on the Grandstand’s fifth floor, personal TV monitors are at each table with ready access to wagering windows.  For reservations call (626) 574-1035.  FrontRunner Brunch reservations can be made each weekend at santaanita.com/events.–TURF TERRACE RESTAURANT–Located on the Grandstand third and fifth floors, just past the finish line, this spectacular area is outdoors but fully covered, with easy access to wagering and each table includes a personal TV.  Turf Terrace Packages can be purchased at santaanita.com/events and to make a reservation, please visit santaanita.com/reservations.  To make a reservation by phone, please call (626) 574-1030.–SANTA ANITA’S NEW LOGE BOX SEAT INITIATIVE–As a special offer for the 2019 Autumn Meet, enjoy a day at the races in these brand new boxes for only $12 per seat.  Visit santaanita.com/events to purchase online and save.–INQUIRIES REGARDING THE AVAILABILITY OF SEASON AND DAILY LUXURY SUITES (including all-new Stretch Run Suites), should be directed to Santa Anita Group Sales at (626) 574-6400.–SANTA ANITA OFFERS FREE INFIELD PARKING AND ADMISSION EACH WEEKEND VIA GATE SIX OFF OF COLORADO PLACE ON THE TRACK’S NORTHERN PERIMETER.–WITH SPECTACULAR VISUALS of morning training and the San Gabriel Mountains, admission to Clockers’ Corner, located at the top of the stretch, is free each morning and a full breakfast menu is available to attendees from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m., seven days a week.—FREE SEABISCUIT TRAM TOURS OF THE STABLE AREA are available each weekend morning at 9:45 a.m., weather permitting.  Tours depart from Clockers’ Corner.–THE CALIFORNIA RETIREMENT MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT (CARMA), which retrains and re-homes retired racehorses, maintains an office at Santa Anita and can be reached directly at Carma4horses.org.For additional information, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

BALLYHANNA SKELETONS HELP MODERN MEDICINE TO FIGHT BONE DISEASE

first_imgA study of more than a thousand skeletons dating from between the 8th to the 17th Century shows that medieval Irish women of advanced years suffered arthritis like we do today however those who suffered from osteoporosis tended to be fitter than modern day sufferers of equivalent age.“These clues could have vital implications for how we regard exercise in the treatment of osteoporosis today,” says Dr Carmel Silke of the Irish Society of RheumatologyThousand year old skeletons unearthed from a “lost” medieval graveyard in County Donegal are providing vital new clues which could change the way doctors treat osteoporosis and other bone diseases in Ireland, the Irish Society for Rheumatology can reveal. At its national meeting to be held in Sligo next weekend, the ISR will hear how a study of more than a thousand skeletons dating from between the 8th to the 17th Century shows that medieval Irish women of advanced years suffered arthritis like we do today however those who suffered from osteoporosis tended to be fitter than modern day sufferers of equivalent age.Experts believe that a possible reason for this difference is the fact that those older people who suffered from softening and thinning of the bones in medieval times tended to be far more physically active than their modern counterparts.The revelations are contained in a paper to be delivered at the Sligo Clarion Hotel next weekend by Dr Catriona McKenzie of Queens University Belfast who, along with The Institute of Technology in Sligo, has been examining the bones contained in the Ballyhanna graveyard in Donegal which was rediscovered after having been lost for centuries. A total of 1,280 skeletons have been uncovered.“These clues could have vital implications for how we regard exercise in the treatment of osteoporosis today,” says Dr Carmel Silke of the ISR. Furthermore, Dr McKenzie has studied the presence of arthritis in these skeletons. Common joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, have affected humans for thousands of years. However, it is only in recent decades that revolutionary treatments have altered the disease course, allowing such patients to lead normal lives. “This year our conference is entitled “Rheumatology in transition” and most of the speakers will be from the Island of Ireland given the many radical transformations and research now taking place Irish Rheumatology.”High on the agenda is the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in young people.“People forget that children also suffer from debilitating diseases like arthritis,” says Dr Silke.  The challenges are to be outlined in a paper by Dr Orla Killeen of the National Children’s Hospital in Crumlin, who was until recently the only paediatric rheumatologist practicing in all of Ireland.The Conference, which will run on September 29 and 30 will also include the following talks: Rheumatoid Arthritis – A Disease in Transition by Prof Iain McInnes, Establishing a Database – Time to Stop Talking by Dr Austin Stack and a paper on the subject of Pharmacoeconomics (the cost of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis) delivered by Dr Roisin Adams. There will also be a debate between Mr Derek Bennett and Professor Geraldine Mc Carthy on the optimal management of osteoarthritis.ENDS The Irish Society of Rheumatology National Meeting will take place in The Clarion Hotel, Sligo September 29 – 30,BALLYHANNA SKELETONS HELP MODERN MEDICINE TO FIGHT BONE DISEASE was last modified: September 27th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ballyhanna skeletonsdonegal skeletonsmedical researchlast_img read more