Celebrate Canada Day in Fort St. John

first_imgCalling all pie lovers – the Fort St. John North Peace Museum’s annual pie sale is back. Enhance your Canada Day celebrations with homemade pie from 12 pm to 4 pm at the museum. Delicious homemade fruit pies, ice cream,…More Info » Canada Day CelebrationsTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 12:00pmCelebrations in the Park, Inflatables, farmers market, face painting, cowboy town, crafts for children, live entertainment with local performances, food vendors, games and more family fun! For more information on Canada Day please contact the Recreation Programmer at 250-794-3262 If you are…More Info » Canada Day Chili Cook OffTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 1:00pmCanada Day Chili Cook off at The Fort St. John Masonic Hall! Calling all chili lovers and experts! Come by on Canada Day for some cook off fun! Enjoy live music and soak up some sun! Enter your special chili…Advertisement Canada Day Pie SaleTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 12:00pmAdvertisement Canada Day ParadeTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 11:00amCanada Day Parade Please be advised of the Annual Canada Day Parade starting at 11:00am. Intersections on the route will be temporarily closed until the parade passes. The route is as follows: leaving the North Peace Arena and heading North on…More Info » Energize Downtown Public Drop-inTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 12:00pmAn integrated team of planning and design professionals will collaborate with local stakeholders to develop design concepts for downtown. Results will be shared at our Design Workshop Drop-In on June 26 from 6-8 pm. Please attend the drop-in to provide feedback…More Info »Advertisementcenter_img Art in the Park- Advertisement -Tuesday, July 1, 2014 – 9:00amFor more information please contact the FSJ Arts Council at 250-787-2781. Event details to come as they become available…More Info »Advertisement More Info » Fort St John Classic Cruisers Canada Day Show and ShineTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 8:00amShine up your ride and bring it down town on July 1st, Canada Day for a chance at trophy’s and Door Prizes. Registration from 8 to 11 am. The parade starts at 11 am for those who want to do…More Info » Canada Day FireworksTuesday, July 1, 2014 – 11:00pmCanada Fireworks at Surrerus Fields. For more information on Canada Day please contact the Recreation Programmer at 250-794-3262 If you are interested in volunteering or participating in the Canada Day Celebrations, please contact the Leisure Services Department at recreation@fortstjohn.ca….More Info »last_img read more

Job Vacancy: Full-time Office Administrator required

first_imgJob Vacancy: A Donegal business is seeking to recruit an Office Administrator in the Donegal Town area.This is a temporary full-time position and is 40 hrs per week; which will include flexible hours and Saturday work.Essential Job Skills and Qualifications: Precious accounting and bookkeeping experienceDebtors & Creditors/Accounts payable and all related mattersGeneral Administration ExperienceStrong IT Skills – i.e. full knowledge of Microsoft Office and Good Typing SkillsExcellent written and verbal communication skillsStrong organisation skills with keen attention to detailThe ability to work as part of a team with a can-do attitude and collaborative approveA professional telephone mannerStrong customer service skillsThe ability to multi-task, prioritise, meet deadlines and work independentlyTransport management skillsTo apply for this role, please send your CV, with Office Administrator 311 in the email subject line, to donegaldailyjobs@gmail.comClosing date for applications Friday 9th November 2018Job Vacancy: Full-time Office Administrator required was last modified: November 5th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AccountingadministrationBookkeepingdonegal town jobsfull-time jobsJob VacancyOffice Administratoroffice jobslast_img read more

Facing Reality About Life on Other Planets: Moon, Atmosphere, and Mass

first_imgby Dr Henry RichterThis is a continuation of my discussion on the requirements for life to exist on a planet elsewhere in the universe. Facing Reality #1 listed 20 features and characteristics, all of which are required for life to exist and flourish. It also addressed the importance of our location in the galaxy. Facing Reality #2 addressed our location in the solar system and characteristics of our orbit. Now we will move in closer to our planet earth, and look at what our moon does for us, examine a little about the earth itself, and then discuss our atmosphere.The MoonApollo astronaut Jim Irwin standing on the moon in “Moon Rovers” by Alan Bean. Used by permission.Earth has a satellite moon, about a quarter of a million miles away. It is about one-fourth the size of the earth, and in a nearly circular orbit around the earth. Each orbit takes just under thirty days – a month (from “moon-th”). This moon does a number of things for us, some of which are important to the support of higher forms of life.First, the gravitational pull of the moon helps stabilize the tilt of the earth as it spins once a day. This tilt is important because it creates the seasons. As the earth progresses around the sun, making a complete trip in a year, direct sunlight varies throughout the year. For the summer solstice the northern hemisphere get more straight-on sunshine, for the two equinoxes the sunshine illuminates our sphere equally, then for the winter solstice the southern hemisphere gets more sun. Having these seasons fosters plant growth and re-growth in a cyclic pattern, giving us more productivity of plants—not to mention a more interesting environment to live in.Second, the gravitational pull of the moon creates tides in the ocean and in the earth’s crust. Tides in the oceans are important since this is what stirs the water up, allowing it to absorb oxygen from the atmosphere (essential to marine life) and moves nutrients around. The movement of water from the ocean’s depths causes constant mixing; without it, the oceans would be stale water, not healthful to life forms (both plant and animal). The tidal action is minimal at the equator, and substantial at high latitudes, being as much as fifty feet of vertical movement in parts of Alaska. There the tides are such that one does not want to be trapped on one of the mud flats in the ocean inlets, as this much tidal action means the water rushes in and out faster than one can run.The pull on the earth’s crust is not so noticeable, but does cause some movement on a geographical scale. This flexes the earth’s surface, and does facilitate tectonic movement under the crust.  It helps the earth’s dynamics, freshening the surface and sub-surface mantle. Let me digress a moment with something that really impresses me.There are a large number of features that do not relate to allowing life, but make life interesting. I have commented from time to time about features that allow scientific exploration related to an understanding of the universe and its principles. I note that the moon is of an exact size and location to exactly blot out the sun in a very precise way. The fact that we have solar eclipses that allow a special examination of the sun is remarkable. When the moon juxtaposes itself in front of the sun, often there is an exact fit to blot out just the sun, but not its atmosphere. When a total solar eclipse occurs, the sun’s atmosphere (the chromosphere), and its spectra can be recorded. Because of this tight fit, much was learned about the sun – one example being the discovery of the element helium. If the moon were 1% larger, the chromosphere would be hidden. If the moon were 1% smaller, there would be too much light to see the chromosphere (as occurs in annular eclipses) Fascinating!Great American Eclipse of Aug 21, 2017, by Dave WeberThe AtmosphereMoving in even closer we come to the earth’s atmosphere. The atmosphere is very thin and is held in by gravity. The amount of atmosphere results in a gas pressure that is low enough to not crush delicate life and chemical structures. Some planets have an atmosphere that is destructively dense with correspondingly high pressures. Venus, for example, has a dense atmosphere of carbon dioxide with such pressure that it crushes spacecraft that have landed on the planet. That particular notorious ‘global warming’ gas also creates a greenhouse effect, making the atmosphere unsurvivably hot. Earth’s atmospheric pressure is high enough to supply oxygen to tissues in a quantity sufficient to facilitate metabolism.Again, we see other factors that are just right, such as the composition of the earth’s atmosphere. Three main components comprise our atmosphere: 21% oxygen, 78% nitrogen and 1% carbon dioxide. The oxygen is necessary for metabolism. Too much oxygen would overwhelm the metabolic chemical reactions; i.e., they would in essence burn up. Too little oxygen would not support metabolic reactions. The nitrogen, although somewhat inert, provides enough substance to the atmosphere to maintain its thickness. Nitrogen is used by plants to build molecules such as amino acids, and thus is also a vital element for life. As we breathe, nitrogen helps sweep out our lungs, clearing out carbon dioxide, a waste product from our body metabolism. The low concentration of carbon dioxide provides enough carbon for plant growth. It also helps regulate the temperature of the atmosphere. There is much public concern about the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the possibility of climate change. Just a small change in the carbon dioxide percentage can cause global changes in temperature. Some of the oxygen exists in the form of ozone in the high atmosphere which absorbs harmful ultraviolet light from the sun.Lightning storms from Earth orbit (NASA)Another important role of the atmosphere is to transport water. As planets go, Earth’s atmosphere is generally pretty mild wind-wise. Some of the planets have violent windstorms with velocities of many hundreds of miles per hour. We have an occasional hurricane or typhoon, but, in general, winds are gentle. Water evaporates from the ocean and lakes and is carried around by our atmosphere. Clouds form and the water drops to earth as rain or snow, thus watering most of the continents. Although probably not a key requisite for life, the transport of water to wet the land is sure a good thing.The inner planets have atmospheres of carbon dioxide, methane, oxygen, and nitrogen.  The outer planets – the gas giants – are mainly hydrogen, helium, and traces of methane and ammonia. All the planets (except earth, of course) have atmospheres that would not support life. They also have temperatures that will not support life.Earth’s MassThe mass of the earth is just right to create gravitational attraction sufficient to hold things to the surface, and to maintain our atmosphere. Too much gravity would make living structures (at least as we know them) have a difficult time growing and moving. Too little gravity would mean no atmosphere, so the mass of a planet needs to be within a certain range. The mass of the earth is distributed from the iron-nickel core, to the mantle, and to the subsurface material and the rocky surface.In the next segment of this series, we will examine additional realities that must be faced to have a habitable planet, finding once again that the earth is right in the ‘Goldilocks Zone’ of being just right.Is the earth a product of design or chance? Photo by David CoppedgeDr Henry Richter, a contributing science writer to Creation-Evolution Headlines, was a key player at NASA/JPL in the early days of the American space program. With a PhD in Chemistry, Physics and Electrical Engineering from Caltech), Dr Richter brings a perspective about science with the wisdom of years of personal involvement. His book America’s Leap Into Space: My Time at JPL and the First Explorer Satellites (2015), chronicles the beginnings of the space program based on his own records and careful research into rare NASA documents, providing unequaled glimpses into events and personnel in the early days of rocketry that only an insider can give. His next book, Spacecraft Earth: A Guide for Passengers, is due out later in 2017. For more about Dr Richter, see his Author Profile.(Visited 420 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

AgTube: Cattle struggle to stay afloat in Texas flood waters

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Sheriff’s deputies in a town near Houston shot this video of more than a hundred cows struggling to stay afloat in flood waters on Wednesday.last_img

The (not so spooky) tale of Halloween pumpkins

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On a day with no shortage of haunting pumpkins around the corner, many people may be wondering just how the largest, most terrifying of these autumn staples come to be. The answer is not nearly as spooky as the end product. A bit of late night investigation will reveal there is a fair amount of agricultural expertise behind those giant Halloween pumpkins.Even first-time growers are capable of growing pumpkins in excess of 400 pounds if the seeds are the Atlantic Giant variety, which are available at numerous garden centers and catalogs, according to Mike Estadt, educator, Ohio State University Extension.“To grow pumpkins in excess of half a ton, it all begins with superior genetics,” Estadt wrote in Growing Giant Pumpkins in the Home Garden, a new Ohioline fact sheet.Ohioline is OSU Extension’s free online information resource and can be found at ohioline.osu.edu. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.Generally speaking, some of the other things to consider when growing pumpkins, Estadt said, include the following.Site selection and planting: Each pumpkin plant should be allowed 1,000 square feet of growing space in an area that has several hours of daily sunlight and access to water, considering that pumpkins require large amounts of water.Fertilizer and lime: When planting, you’ll need to have the soil tested to determine whether lime and fertilizers are needed based on your soil requirements.Planting and space requirements: The pumpkin seeds should be planted individually in 12-inch peat pots indoors in April and can be transferred to the ground when the first true leaf is fully expanded, typically 10–14 days after seeding. Once planted outside, they can be protected from frost using row covers, or a small greenhouse.Irrigation: Pumpkins have shallow roots, so they will need to be watered slowly with at least 1 inch of water per week if the area doesn’t experience an adequate amount of rainfall.Insects and diseases: An insect and disease control program should be initiated when you transplant the pumpkin plants from the pots to the ground. This is because once a bacterial or viral infection has occurred, there is no way to stop it. And several pests are attracted to pumpkins, including striped cucumber beetles, squash bugs, and squash vie borer.Pollination: While hand pollination is the preferred method to fruit-setting, natural pollination by honey bees, squash bees, and bumble bees will also work well.Shade: Once the pumpkins get to a certain size, they need to be protected from direct sunlight. For example, you can use a bedsheet draped over the pumpkin, leaving the stem exposed.Ohio is one of the top producers of the large, carving type of pumpkins, usually ranking between third or fourth among states for pumpkin production, according to the Ohio Department of Agriculture, with more that 66 million pounds of pumpkin produced statewide last year.And, from a nutritional standpoint, pumpkins are an excellent, healthy food because they are low in calories, are full of potassium and antioxidants, and the seeds make excellently nutritious and tasty snacks.last_img read more

Quick—Sign Up To Download Apple’s New OS X Yosemite Beta While You Can

first_imgRelated Posts If you’re ready to make a move, it’s easy to opt in on Apple’s official OS X Beta Program hub. While it’s open to everyone, you’ll need an Apple ID (the login and password you use to make App Store and iTunes purchases and the like) to sign up. At this point, it’s pretty much that easy—though do be conscious of Apple’s notoriously stringent Terms of Service agreement (which I’m sure none of us intend to violate).Also, you’ll need to be running OS X Mavericks, the current version of Mac OS X software, available as a free Mac App Store download here.Bear in mind that much like any other prerelease software, the beta version of OS X Yosemite is far more likely to contain bugs and prompt system crashes than a final-release operating system. Apple warns: “We recommend installing OS X Yosemite Beta on a secondary Mac, since it may contain errors or inaccuracies.”Not a bad idea, though we imagine if you’ve read this far already that this probably isn’t your first rodeo. Note that while the OS X Yosemite sign-up website is now up and running, you’ll still have to wait to download the beta itself, which will arrive as a Mac App Store redemption code in your inbox when Apple deems it time. It’s a good idea to back up your Mac in full with Time Machine (or a tool of your choosing) before taking the plunge.Unfortunately, some of OS X Yosemite’s more exciting features won’t make the beta release (yet, anyway), including phone calls, SMS, Handoff, Instant Hotspot, and iCloud Documents. Nonetheless, there should be plenty new to play with, and naturally Apple encourages you to report any lovely idiosyncrasies you run across through a built-in feedback tool in order to help sculpt the final release of OS X Yosemite due out this fall.  If you’re interested in a digital road trip to Yosemite—Apple’s new Mac operating system, not the national park it’s named after—you better call shotgun fast. Apple has opened up OS X Yosemite to the masses via a new OS X beta program that allows developers and otherwise curious Mac users to opt into future Mac software releases before their official launch.Unlike the iOS beta program, which still requires a $99 a year developer account registration with Apple, the OS X beta is open to the precocious general public, all for free. The catch? Only the first one million folks get in line—and when it comes to a company like Apple, one million spots can fill up fast. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo… taylor hatmaker Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Tags:#Apple#Beta Testing#OS X#OS X beta#OS X Yosemite#WWDC#WWDC 2014 How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloudlast_img read more

Creativity Under Pressure: Micro-Budget Your Time

first_imgDon’t get stuck on inconsequentials!  Follow this trick for better time management.It’s easy for creative professionals to get lost in the minutia of their projects, tweaking and reworking to perfection.  Unfortunately though, time is money.  This perfectionist mindset may work for passion projects, but when there’s a paying client involved you need to keep a wider focus.  A broad view of a project’s needs encourages forward momentum – allowing you to get your job done well and on-time.  Follow this trick to keep you moving forward:Micro-Budget Your TimeIn most cases you aren’t blowing your time on one detail. It’s just that when combined, all of those little time drains result in a significant loss.  Are you spending too much time on the little things?  Work with self-imposed time constraints to be more efficient.Say, you’re a photographer.  You’ve got a shot that really needs some color work.  Give yourself a time budget to do it, “I’ve got 5 minutes to tweak this shot.”  Watch the clock.  By the end of 5 minutes you would likely have made positive changes to the image.  Now, it’s time to move on.Diminishing Returns Over TimeWithout imposing time constraints, 5 minutes can turn into 10, 20, or much longer.  The more time you spend tackling a detail, the less and less of an impact it has on the final result.  Apply these micro time budgets anytime you start something that you feel has the potential to drag on.Over time you’ll develop a better feel for for how long you should be budgeting for certain tasks based on how long they take you to complete and how important they are to the overall project.This method is applicable for any creative position – video editors, photographers, writers, graphic designers.  Allow yourself to come back to make minor adjustments at the end of the project…IF time allows.Time Management = Key To ProfitabilityYou don’t want to get to the end of budgeted hours and still have significant progress to make.   Either the client will have to pay for additional time (which they certainly do not want to do) or you have to accept any additional work put in as a profit loss.  Sharpen your time management skills.  It’s imperative for increasing your success and profitability.Got time management and productivity tips for success?Please share them in the comments!last_img read more