Arctic cold front to bring weekend wind, rain, snow

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Usually balmy Southern California will get downright chilly this weekend as a blast of cold air moves in from Alaska, bringing heavy rain, thunderstorms and snow to the local mountains, forecasters said Thursday. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm watch beginning tonight, warning of cold temperatures, wind gusts up to 40 mph and significant precipitation, including snow to the 1,500-foot level. “The bulk of the rain will come Saturday,” said Bill Forwood, meteorologist with the NWS. “You’ll have showers that will last through Sunday.” The NWS expects between 1 and 2 inches of rain in the San Gabriel Valley, Forwood said. Rain and snow will make travel treacherous, officials said, especially along Interstate 5 from Castaic to the Grapevine, as well as Interstate 15 through Soledad Canyon. “People like to go to the mountains when there is snow, but they need to make sure that the roadways are clear and open and that they have chains if required,” said California Highway Patrol Officer Humberto Jimenez. Rainfall from tonight through Sunday is expected to range from a half-inch to an inch across coastal and valley locations, with 2 inches in the foothills and mountains. Officials at mountain resorts say they will welcome the snow, but the stormy conditions might slow traffic over the weekend. “We’re looking forward to it. Any snow that we get is going to be fantastic,” said John McColly, director of marketing for Mountain High Resort in Wrightwood. “I think we are going to see good business this weekend, but not huge crowds because of the weather. I hope we have great business next week.” Ventura County agriculture officials said the Southland’s winter has been mild, encouraging avocado trees to bloom early, and farmers fear the cold snap could slow the bloom and reduce next year’s crop. Agricultural Commissioner Earl McPhail said farmers will be staying close to home this weekend to protect their crops. “These late winter storms are pretty unpredictable, especially this far south,” he said. “Normally we don’t have any major freezes after February, but anything is possible.” eric.leach@dailynews.com (805) 583-7602last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *